Etymology
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barrel (n.)

"cylindrical vessel or cask, generally bulging in the middle and made of wooden staves bound by hoops," c. 1300, from Old French baril "barrel, cask, vat" (12c.), with cognates in all Romance languages (Italian barile, Spanish barril, etc.), but of unknown origin. Also a measure of capacity of varying quantity.

The meaning "metal tube of a gun" is from 1640s. Barrel-roll (n.) in aeronautics is from 1920. To be over a barrel figuratively, "in a helpless or vulnerable condition," is by 1914 and might suggest corporal punishment.

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barrel (v.)

mid-15c., "put in barrels," from barrel (n.). The meaning "move quickly" is 1930, American English slang, perhaps suggestive of a rolling barrel. Related: Barreled; barreling.

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pickle (n.)

c. 1400, "spiced sauce served with meat or fowl" (early 14c. as a surname), probably from Middle Dutch pekel "pickle, brine," or related words in Low German and East Frisian (Dutch pekel, East Frisian päkel, German pökel), which are of uncertain origin or original meaning. Klein suggests the name of a medieval Dutch fisherman who developed the process.

The meaning "cucumber preserved in pickle" first recorded 1707, via use of the word for the salty liquid in which meat, etc. was preserved (c. 1500). Colloquial figurative sense of "a sorry plight, a state or condition of difficulty or disorder" is recorded by 1560s, from the time when the word still meant a sauce served on meat about to be eaten. Meaning "troublesome boy" is from 1788, perhaps from the notion of being "imbued" with roguery.

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pickle (v.)

"to preserve in a pickle or brine," 1550s, from pickle (n.). Related: Pickled; pickling.

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piccalilli (n.)

"pickle of chopped vegetables," 1769, piccalillo, perhaps a fanciful elaboration of pickle. Spelling with an -i attested from 1845.

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pickled (adj.)

1550s, "preserved in a pickle sauce," past-participle adjective from pickle (v.). From 1690s as "roguish;" the slang figurative sense of "drunk" is attested by 1900, American English.

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barrelful (n.)

"as much as a barrel will hold," late 14c., from barrel (n.) + -ful.

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marinate (v.)

"to pickle (fish, meat) in a marinade," 1640s, from French mariner "to pickle in (sea) brine," from Old French marin (adj.) "of the sea," from Latin marinus "of the sea," from mare "sea, the sea, seawater," from PIE root *mori- "body of water." Related: Marinated; marinating.

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barrelhouse (n.)

"cheap saloon, often with an associated brothel," by 1875, American English, so called in reference to the barrels of beer or booze typically stacked along the wall. See barrel (n.) + house (n.).

Q. What was this place you rented? — A. It was a room adjoining a barrel-house.
Q. What is a barrel house? — A. It is a room where barrels of whisky are tapped, a very inferior kind of whisky, and the whisky is sold by the glassful right out of the barrel. It is a primitive coffee house. [Committee Report of the 43rd Congress, Select Committee on Conditions of the South, 1874-75]
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marinade (n.)

"a pickle for fish or meat, generally of wine and vinegar with herbs and spices," 1704, from French marinade "spiced vinegar or brine for pickling," from mariner "to pickle in (sea) brine," from Old French marin (adj.) "of the sea," from Latin marinus "of the sea," from mare "sea, the sea, seawater," from PIE root *mori- "body of water." As a verb, "to steep in a marinade," from 1680s. Related: Marinaded; marinading.

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