Etymology
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condition (v.)

late 15c., "to make conditions, stipulate," from condition (n.). Meaning "subject to something as a condition" is from 1520s; sense of "form a prerequisite of" is from 1868. Meaning "to bring to a desired condition" is from 1844; psychological sense of "teach or accustom (a person or animal) to certain habits or responses" is from 1909. Related: Conditioned; conditioning.

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physiological (adj.)

c. 1600, "of or pertaining to natural science" (a sense now obsolete), from physiology + -ical. From 1814 as "of or pertaining to physiology, relating to the functions and properties of living bodies." Related: Physiologically.

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condition (n.)

mid-14c., condicioun, "particular mode of being of a person or thing," also "a requisite or prerequisite, a stipulation," from Old French condicion "stipulation; state; behavior; social status" (12c., Modern French condition), from Medieval Latin conditionem (nominative conditio), properly condicio "agreement; stipulation; the external position, situation, rank, place, circumstances" of persons, "situation, condition, nature, manner" of things, from condicere "to speak with, talk together, agree upon," in Late Latin "consent, assent," from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + dicere "to speak" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly").

Classical Latin condicio was confused in Late Latin with conditio "a making," from conditus, past participle of condere "to put together." The sense evolution in Latin apparently was from "stipulation" to "situation, mode of being."

Meaning "rank or state with respect to ordered society" is from late 14c. in English. From the notion of "prerequisite" comes the sense of "a restricting or limiting circumstance" (late 14c.). Also in Middle English "personal character, disposition" (mid-14c.).

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sympathize (v.)

"have fellow-feeling," c. 1600, from French sympathiser, from sympathie (see sympathy). Earlier in a physiological sense (1590s). As "express sympathy," from 1748. Related: Sympathized; sympathizing.

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infantilism (n.)
1894 in the psychological sense; see infantile + -ism. Earlier in a physiological sense, "retarded and imperfect physical development," perhaps from French infantilisme (1871).
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isometric (adj.)
1838, literally "of the same measure," from iso- "the same, equal" + -metric. The components are Greek: isos "equal, identical" + metron "a measure." Originally a method of using perspective in drawing; later in reference to crystals. The physiological sense relating to muscular action is from 1889, from German isometrisch in this sense (1882).
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melatonin (n.)

chemical formed in the pineal gland of mammals that regulates certain physiological activities, 1958, from Greek melas "black, dark" (see melano-) + ending from serotonin. So called because its secretion is inhibited by sunlight, or because it changes the skin color of certain reptiles and amphibians.

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precondition (n.)

"an antecedent condition, a condition requisite in advance," 1825, from pre- "before" + condition (n.). As a verb from 1841. Related: Preconditioned; preconditioning.

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elaboration (n.)

1570s, in a physiological sense relating to tissue development, from Late Latin elaborationem (nominative elaboratio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin elaborare "work out, produce by labor, endeavor, struggle," from ex "out" (see ex-) + laborare "to labor" (see labor (v.)). Meaning "act of working out in great exactness and detail" is from 1610s.

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recondition (v.)

also re-condition, "restore to a proper or usable condition," 1850, from re- "back, again" + condition (v.). Related: Reconditioned; reconditioning.

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