Etymology
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photographic (adj.)

"of, pertaining to, using, or produced by photography," 1839, from photograph + -ic. Meaning "minutely accurate" is by 1864; photographic memory is from 1865. Related: Photographical; photographically.

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material (adj.)

mid-14c., "real, ordinary; earthly, drawn from the material world" (contrasted with spiritual, mental, supernatural), a term in scholastic philosophy and theology, from Old French material, materiel (14c.) and directly from Late Latin materialis (adj.) "of or belonging to matter," from Latin materia "matter, stuff, wood, timber" (see matter (n.)).

From late 14c. as "made of matter, having material existence; material, physical, substantial." From late 15c. as "important, relevant, necessary, pertaining to the matter or subject;" in the law of evidence, "of legal significance to the cause" (1580s).

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material (n.)

late 14c., "component substance, matter from which a thing is made," from material (adj.).

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photocopy (v.)

1924, "make a photographic reproduction," from photo- "photographic" + copy (v.). The usual modern meaning arose 1942 with the advent of xerography. The noun is recorded from 1934. Related: Photocopied; photocopying.

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photomontage (n.)

"use of photographs or photographic negatives to make art or illustration," 1931, from photo + montage.

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pixel (n.)

"small, square single-colored display elements that comprise an image," 1969, coined to describe the photographic elements of a television image, from pix + first syllable of element.

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photo- 

word-forming element meaning "light" or "photographic" or "photoelectric," from Greek photo-, combining form of phōs (genitive phōtos) "light" (from PIE root *bha- (1) "to shine").

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telephoto (adj.)
also tele-photo, 1898, shortened form of telephotographic (1892), in reference to lenses introduced at that time to increase the magnification of photographs taken by a camera, from tele- + photographic.
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shutter (n.)
1540s, "one who shuts" (see shut (v.)); meaning "movable wooden or iron screen for a window" is from 1680s. Photographic sense of "device for opening and closing the aperture of a lens" is from 1862.
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microfilm (n.)

"photographic film containing microphotographs of the pages of a book, etc.," 1927, coined from micro- + film (n.). The verb is by 1940, from the noun. Related: Microfilmed; microfilming.

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