Etymology
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Philip 

masc. proper name, most famously in classical history king of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great (compare philippic); the from Latin Philippus, from Greek Philippos "fond of horses," from philos "beloved, loving" (see philo-) + hippos "horse" (from PIE root *ekwo- "horse"). Skelton made it the name applied to a common sparrow (perhaps from resemblance to the bird's call). In 16c., Philip and Cheyney was a way to say "any two common men."

You remember the story of the poor woman who importuned King Philip of Macedon to grant her justice, which Philip refused : the woman exclaimed, "I appeal" : the king, astonished, asked to whom she appealed : the woman replied, "From Philip drunk to Philip sober." [Emerson, "New England Reformers," 1844]
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Philippa 
fem. proper name, modern, fem. of Philip.
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Philippines 

archipelago in southeast Asia at the western edge of the Pacific Ocean, from Spanish Islas Filipinas, literally "the islands of Philip," named 1542 by Spanish explorer Ruy López de Villalobos in honor of Philip, Prince of Asturias, who was later Philip II, king of Spain. Related: Philippine. Other early names for then in Spanish included Islas del Poniente "Islands of the West."

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philippic (n.)

"a bitter invective discourse, a denunciation," 1590s, from French philippique, from Latin (orationes) Philippicæ, a translation of Greek Philippikoi (logoi), referrimg to the series of orations made in Athens by Demosthenes in 351-341 B.C.E. urging Greeks to awaken to their danger and unite to fight the rising power of Philip II of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great. The Latin phrase was used of the speeches made by Cicero against Marc Antony in 44 and 43 B.C.E.

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*ekwo- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "horse." Perhaps related to *ōku- "swift."

It forms all or part of: alfalfa; Eohippus; equestrian; equine; equus; hippo-; hippocampus; Hippocratic; Hippocrene; hippocrepian; hippodrome; hippogriff; Hippolytus; hippopotamus; Philip; philippic; Philippines; Xanthippe.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit açva-, Avestan aspa-, Greek hippos, Latin equus, Old Irish ech, Old Church Slavonic ehu-, Old English eoh, Gothic aihwa- all meaning "horse."
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silver bullet (n.)
"very effective, almost magical remedy," 1808. The belief in the magical power of silver weapons to conquer foes goes back at least to ancient Greece (as in Delphic Oracle's advice to Philip of Macedon).
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armada (n.)
"fleet of warships," 1530s (armado), from Spanish armada "an armed force," from Medieval Latin armata "armed force" (see army). Current form of the word is from 1590s. The fleet sent by Philip II of Spain against England in 1588 was being called the Spanish Armada by 1613, the Invincible Armada by 1632.
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oratory (n.2)

"small chapel for prayer or worship," early 14c., oratorie, from Old French oratorie and directly from Late Latin oratorium "place of prayer" (especially the Oratory of St. Philip Neri in Rome, where musical services were presented; see oratorio), noun use of an adjective, as in oratorium templum, from neuter of Latin oratorius "of or for praying," from ōrare "to pray, plead, speak" (see orator).

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staid (adj.)

1540s, "fixed, permanent," adjectival use of stayed, past participle of stay (v.). Meaning "sober, sedate" first recorded 1550s. As in Philip Sidney's justice staid, explained by Ruskin as "The desire of what is just, being stayed or restrained within the limits of what can be accomplished by just means." Related: Staidly.

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sousaphone (n.)

1903, named for U.S. bandleader and composer John Philip Sousa (1854-1932).

The first sousaphone was made by C.G. Conn in 1899 expressly for Sousa's band and its bell opened directly upward. The present bell-front type was first made in 1908. ["International Cyclopedia of Music," 1939]
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