Etymology
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pelt (n.1)

early 15c., "the skin of a fur-bearing animal with the hair on it," especially of the smaller animals used in furriery, a word of uncertain origin, perhaps a contraction of pelet (c. 1300 in Anglo-Latin), from Old French pelete "fine skin, membrane," diminutive of pel "skin," from Latin pellis "skin, hide" (from PIE root *pel- (3) "skin, hide"). Or perhaps the English word is a back-formation Anglo-French pelterie, Old French peletrie "fur skins," from Old French peletier "furrier," from pel. It was later used also of skins stripped of wool or fur (1560s).

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pelt (n.2)

"an act of pelting," 1510s, from pelt (v.). Of the beating of the rain by 1862.

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pelt (v.)

"to strike repeatedly" (with something), c. 1500, a word of unknown origin; according to one old theory it is perhaps from early 13c. pelten "to strike," a variant of pilten "to thrust, strike," from an unrecorded Old English *pyltan, from Medieval Latin *pultiare, from Latin pultare "to beat, knock, strike," or [Watkins] pellere "to push, drive, strike" (from PIE root *pel- (5) "to thrust, strike, drive"). OED doubts this. Or it might be from Old French peloter "to strike with a ball," from pelote "ball" (see pellet (n.)) [Klein].

From 1680s as "to go on throwing (missiles) with intent to strike." The meaning "proceed rapidly and without intermission" (1831) is from the notion of beating the ground with rapid steps. Related: Pelted; pelting.

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along (adv., prep.)
Old English andlang "entire, continuous; extended" (adj.); "alongside of" (prep.), from and- "opposite, against" (from Proto-Germanic *andi-, *anda-, from PIE *anti "against," locative singular of root *ant- "front, forehead") + lang "long" (see long (adj.)). Reinforced by Old Norse cognate endlang. Prepositional sense extended in Old English to "through the whole length of." Of position, "lengthwise," c. 1200; of movement, "onward," c. 1300. Meaning "in company, together" is from 1580s. All along "throughout" is from 1690s.
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sing-along 
1959, noun and adjective, from verbal phrase; see sing (v.) + along (adv.). Originally associated with U.S. music producer Mitch Miller (1911-2010).
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get along (v.)
"agree, live harmoniously," 1875, from get (v.) + along (adv.).
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parka (n.)

1780, "hooded outer garment made of skins, worn by Eskimos," from Aleut parka, from Russian parka "a pelt or jacket made from pelt," which is said to be from Samoyed, a Uralic language spoken in Siberia. As the trade name of a similar wind-proof manufactured garment (also known as an anorak), by 1958.

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alongshore (adj.)
"existing or employed along a shore or coast," 1779, from along + shore (n.). Compare along-ships (adv.) "lengthwise to the ship" (1680s).
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stone (v.)
c. 1200, "to pelt with stones," from stone (n.). From c. 1600 as "to fit with stones;" 1630s as "to free from stones" (of fruit, etc.). Related: Stoned; stoning.
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nutria (n.)

"fur or pelt of the coypu," a kind of large, beaver-like rodent native to southern South America, 1836, from Spanish nutria "otter," also lutria, from Latin lutra "otter," an unexplained variant of PIE *udros (see otter).

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