Etymology
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passing (adv.)

"in a (sur)passing degree, surpassingly," late 14c.; from passing (adj); see pass (v.).

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passing (n.)

"death," 1869, a euphemistic verbal noun from pass (v.) in such Middle English phrases as passing of death, passing of the soul (c. 1300). A passing-bell (1520s) was a church bell tolled at the time of a person's death.

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passing (adj.)

mid-14c., "transitory;" late 14c., "going by," present-participle adjective from pass (v.). Also from late 14c. as "surpassing, excellent," and "casual, superficial, cursory, as though done in passing." Related: Passingly.

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pretermission (n.)

"act of passing by, an omission or disregarding," 1580s, from Latin pretermissionem (nominative pretermissio) "an omission, a passing over," noun of action from past-participle stem of praetermittere "to pass by, let pass, neglect" (see pretermit).

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transitory (adj.)
"passing without continuing," late 14c., from Old French transitoire "ephemeral, transitory" (12c.), from Late Latin transitorius "passing, transient," in classical Latin "allowing passage through," from transitus, past participle of transire "go or cross over" (see transient).
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skip (n.1)
"a spring, a bound," early 15c., from skip (v.). Meaning "a passing over or disregarding" is from 1650s.
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mottled (adj.)

"dappled, marked with spots or patches of color of unequal intensity passing insensibly into one another," 1670s, past-participle adjective from see mottle (v.).

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hibernation (n.)

1660s, "action of passing the winter" (of plants, insect eggs, etc.), from Latin hibernationem (nominative hibernatio) "the action of passing the winter," noun of action from past participle stem of hibernare "to winter, pass the winter, occupy winter quarters;" related to hiems "winter," from PIE root *gheim- "winter." Meaning "dormant condition of animals" is from 1789.

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trans-oceanic (adj.)
1827, "situated across the ocean," from trans- + oceanic. Meaning "passing over the sea" is recorded from 1868.
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bogart (v.)
drug slang, "to keep a joint in your mouth," dangling from the lip like Humphrey Bogart's cigarette in the old movies, instead of passing it on, 1969, first attested in "Easy Rider." The word also was used 1960s with notions of "get something by intimidation, be a tough guy" (again with reference to the actor and the characters he typically played). In old drinking slang, Captain Cork was "a man slow in passing the bottle."
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