Etymology
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package (n.)

1530s, "the act of packing," from pack (n.) + -age; or from cognate Dutch pakkage "baggage." The main modern sense of "a bundle, a parcel, a quantity pressed or packed together" is attested from 1722. Package deal "transaction agreed to as a whole" is from 1952.

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package (v.)

"to bundle up into a pack or package," 1915, from package (n.). Related: Packaged; packaging.

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packaging (n.)

1875, "act of making into a package or packages," from package (n.).

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pre-packaged (adj.)

"packaged at the site of production," 1944, from pre- "before" + package (v.).

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care package (n.)

1945, originally CARE package, supplies sent out by "Cooperative for American Remittances to Europe," established 1945 by U.S. private charities to coordinate delivery of aid packages to displaced persons in Europe after World War II and obviously named for the sake of the acronym. The name was repackaged late 1940s to "Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere," to reflect its expanded mission.

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fardel (n.)

"bundle, burden," c. 1300, from Old French fardel "parcel, package, small pack" (13c., Modern French fardeau), diminutive of farde, which OED says is "cognate with" (others say "from") Spanish fardo "pack, bundle," which is said to be from Arabic fardah "package."

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truss (n.)

c. 1200, "collection of things bound together," from Old French trousse, torse "parcel, package, bundle," of uncertain origin, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *torciare "to twist," from Late Latin torquere "to twist" (from PIE root *terkw- "to twist"). Meaning "surgical appliance to support a rupture, etc." first attested 1540s. Sense of "framework for supporting a roof or bridge" is first recorded 1650s.

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bale (n.)

"large bundle or package of merchandise prepared for transportation," early 14c., from Old French bale "rolled-up bundle" (13c., Modern French balle), from Frankish or some other Germanic source (such as Old High German balla "ball"), from Proto-Germanic *ball- (from PIE root *bhel- (2) "to blow, swell"). The English word perhaps is via Flemish or Dutch, which got it from French.

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parcel (n.)

late 14c., "a portion or part of something" (a sense preserved in the verb and in the phrase parcel of land, which is from c. 1400), from Old French parcele "small piece, particle, parcel," and directly from Medieval Latin parcella, from Vulgar Latin *particella, extended form (via a diminutive suffix, but not necessarily implying smallness) of Latin particula "small part, little bit," itself a diminutive of pars (genitive partis) "a part, piece, fraction" (from PIE root *pere- (2) "to grant, allot").

Meaning "a package" is recorded from 1640s from the earlier sense of "a quantity of goods in a package" (mid-15c.), which is from the late 14c. sense of "an amount or quantity of anything." The expression part and parcel (early 15c.) also preserves the older sense; both words mean the same, the multiplicity is for emphasis. In some old and technical senses, parcel is used as an adjective or adverb meaning "in part, partially, to some degree." Parcel post as a service to deliver packages (later a branch of the postal service) is by 1790.

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dicker (v.)

"haggle, bargain in a petty way," 1802 (implied in dickering), American English, perhaps from dicker (n.) "a unit or package of tens," especially hides (attested from late 13c.), a Germanic word (compare Swedish decker, Danish deger, German decher), which is perhaps from Latin decuria "parcel of ten" (supposedly a unit of barter on the Roman frontier; compare German Decher "set of ten things"), from decem "ten" (from PIE root *dekm- "ten") on model of centuria from centum.

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