Etymology
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mind (n.)

"that which feels, wills, and thinks; the intellect," late 12c., mynd, from Old English gemynd "memory, remembrance; state of being remembered; thought, purpose; conscious mind, intellect, intention," Proto-Germanic *ga-mundiz (source also of Gothic muns "thought," munan "to think;" Old Norse minni "mind;" German Minne (archaic) "love," originally "memory, loving memory"), from suffixed form of PIE root *men- (1) "to think," with derivatives referring to qualities of mind or states of thought.

Meaning "mental faculty, the thinking process" is from c. 1300. Sense of "intention, purpose" is from c. 1300. From late 14c. as "frame of mind. mental disposition," also "way of thinking, opinion." "Memory," one of the oldest senses, now is almost obsolete except in old expressions such as bear in mind (late 14c.), call to mind (early 15c.),keep in mind (late 15c.).

Mind's eye "mental view or vision, remembrance" is from early 15c. To pay no mind "disregard" is recorded by 1910, American English dialect. To make up (one's) mind "determine, come to a definite conclusion" is by 1784. To have a mind "be inclined or disposed" (to do something) is by 1540s; to have half a mind to "to have one's mind half made up to (do something)" is recorded from 1726. Out of (one's) mind "mad, insane" is from late 14c.; out of mind "forgotten" is from c. 1300; phrase time out of mind "time beyond people's memory" is attested from early 15c. 

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presence (n.)

mid-14c., "fact of being present, state of being in a certain place and not some other," also "space before or around someone or something," from Old French presence (12c., Modern French présence), from Latin praesentia "a being present," from praesentem (see present (adj.)).

From late 14c. as "state of being face to face with a superior or great personage." The meaning "carriage, demeanor, aspect" (especially if impressive) is from 1570s; that of "divine, spiritual, or incorporeal being felt as present" is from 1660s. Presence of mind (1660s) "calm, collected state of mind, with the faculties ready at command," is a loan-translation of French présence d'esprit, Latin praesentia animi.

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mind (v.)

mid-14c., "to remember, call to mind, take care to remember," also "to remind oneself," from mind (n.). The Old English verb was myngian, myndgian, from West Germanic *munigon "to remind." Meaning "perceive, notice" is from late 15c.; that of "to give heed to, pay attention to" is from 1550s; that of "be careful about" is from 1737. Sense of "object to, dislike" is from c. 1600. Meaning "to take care of, look after" is from 1690s. Related: Minded; minding.

Negative use "(not) to care for, to trouble oneself with" is attested from c. 1600; never mind "don't let it trouble you" is by 1778; the meiotic expression don't mind if I do is attested from 1847.

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mind-reader (n.)

"one who professes to discern what is in another's mind," by 1862, from mind (n.) + read (v.). Related: Mind-reading (n.), which is attested by 1869. The older word was clairvoyance.

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master-mind (n.)

1720, "an outstanding intellect," from master (n.) + mind (n.). Meaning "head of a criminal enterprise" is attested by 1872. As a verb (also mastermind), "to engage in the highest level of planning and execution of a major operation," from 1940. Related: Masterminded; masterminding.

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mind-boggling (adj.)

"that causes the mind to be overwhelmed," by 1964; see mind (n.) + present participle of boggle (v.).

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self-possession (n.)

"command of one's emotions or powers, presence of mind, calmness," 1734, from self- + possession (n.). Related: Self-possessed. Self-collected for "in command of one's emotions" is from 1711.

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sang-froid (n.)

also sangfroid, "presence of mind, coolness, mental composure," 1712, from French sang froid, literally "cool blood," from sang "blood" (from Latin sanguis; see sanguinary) + froid "cold" (from Latin frigidus; see frigid). "In the 17th c. the expression was in France often written erroneously sens froid, as if it contained sens "sense" instead of the homophonous sang "blood'." [OED].

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copresence (n.)

also co-presence, "act or fact of being present with (another)," 1802, from co- + presence. Related: Copresent.

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hyperglycemia (n.)
1875, from hyper- "over" + glycemia "presence of sugar in the blood."
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