Etymology
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overstate (v.)

1630s, "assume too much grandeur;" see over- + state (n.1). Meaning "exaggerate in statement, declare too strongly" is attested from 1798, from state (v.). Related: Overstated, overstating.

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exaggerate (v.)
Origin and meaning of exaggerate
1530s, "to pile up, accumulate," from Latin exaggeratus, past participle of exaggerare "heighten, amplify, magnify," literally "to heap, pile, load, fill," from ex, here probably "thoroughly" (see ex-), + aggerare "heap up, accumulate," figuratively "amplify, magnify," from agger (genitive aggeris) "heap," from aggerere "bring together, carry toward," from assimilated form of ad "to, toward" (see ad-) + gerere "carry" (see gest). Sense of "overstate" first recorded in English 1560s. Related: Exaggerated; exaggerating.
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