Etymology
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overpower (v.)

"to overcome with superior power, vanquish by superior force," 1590s, from over- + power (v.). Related: Overpowered; overpowering; overpoweringly.

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overmaster (v.)

mid-14c., overmaistren, "overpower, overcome, subdue, vanquish," from over- + master (v.). Related: Overmastered; overmastering.

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overset (n.)

"an overturn, ruin," mid-15c., from over- + set (v.). The verb, "to turn over, cause to capsize," is from 1590s; earlier it meant "to oppress" (c. 1200), "to overpower" (late 14c.). Related: Overset; oversetting.

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dazzle (v.)

late 15c., "be stupefied, be confused" (a sense now obsolete), frequentative of Middle English dasen "be stunned, be bewildered" (see daze (v.)). Originally intransitive; the transitive sense of "overpower with strong or excessive light" is from 1530s. The figurative sense of "overpower or excite admiration by brilliancy or showy display" is from 1560s. As a noun, "brightness, splendor," 1650s. Related: Dazzled; dazzling.

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surprise (v.)
also formerly surprize, late 14c., "overcome, overpower" (of emotions), from the noun or from Anglo-French surprise, fem. past participle of Old French surprendre (see surprise (n.)). Meaning "come upon unexpectedly" is from 1590s; that of "strike with astonishment" is 1650s.
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overbearing (adj.)

"haughty, dictatorial," 1732, figurative present-participle adjective from overbear (v.) in its modern sense "to repress by force, overpower." Earlier the word was used in a literal sense (1670s), but this seems to be obsolete. In Middle English it was a verbal noun, "act of transferring or transporting" (early 15c.).

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overbear (v.)

mid-14c., overberen, "to carry over, transfer, convey," a sense now obsolete (rendering Latin transferre), from over- + bear (v.). Meaning "to bear down by weight of physical force, overpower," is from 1535 (in Coverdale), originally nautical, of an overwhelming wind; figurative sense of "to overcome and repress by power, authority, etc." is from 1560s.

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canoodle (v.)
"to indulge in caresses and fondling endearments" [OED], by 1850s, said to be U.S. slang, of uncertain origin. The earliest known sources are British, but they tend to identify the word as American. In the 1830s it seems to have been in use in Britain in a sense of "cheat" or "overpower." Related: Canoodled; canoodling.
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supprise (n.)
mid-15c., "injury, wrong, outrage," from supprise (v.) "overpower, subdue, put down; grieve, afflict" (c. 1400), also "take unawares, attack unexpectedly" (mid-15c.), from Anglo-French supprise, fem. past participle of supprendre, variant of sorprendre (see surprise (n.)). The noun later also had sense "oppression; surprise attack," but perhaps originally was an alternate form of surprise used in a specific sense.
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crush (v.)

mid-14c., "smash, shatter, break into fragments or small particles; force down and bruise by heavy weight," also figuratively, "overpower, subdue," from Old French cruissir (Modern French écraser), variant of croissir "to gnash (teeth), crash, smash, break," which is perhaps from Frankish *krostjan "to gnash" (cognates: Gothic kriustan, Old Swedish krysta "to gnash").

Figurative sense of "to humiliate, demoralize" is by c. 1600. Related: Crushed; crushing; crusher. Italian crosciare, Catalan cruxir, Spanish crujir "to crack, creak" are Germanic loan-words.

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