Etymology
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overflow (v.)

Middle English overflouen, from Old English oferfleow "to flow across, flood, inundate," also "to flow over (a brim or bank);" see over- + flow (v.). Common Germanic (Old High German ubarfliozan, German überfliessen, etc.). Related: Overflowed; overflowing.

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overflow (n.)

1580s, "act of overflowing, an inundation," also "the excess that flows over," from overflow (v.).

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redound (v.)

late 14c., redounden, "to overflow, flow abundantly; abound, multiply, increase" (senses now obsolete), also "to flow or go back" (to a place or person), "be sent, rolled, or driven back," from Old French redonder "overflow, abound, be in profusion" (12c.), from Latin redundare "to overflow" (see redundant). Hence "to contribute, have effect" (to the credit, honor, etc.), early 15c. Related: Redounded; redounding.

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surround (v.)

early 15c., surrounden, "to flood, overflow," from Anglo-French surounder, Old French soronder, suronder "to overflow, abound; surpass, dominate," from Late Latin superundare "overflow," from Latin super "over" (see super-) + undare "to flow in waves," from unda "wave" (from PIE root *wed- (1) "water; wet;" compare abound). Sense of "to shut in on all sides" first recorded 1610s, influenced by figurative meaning in French of "dominate," and by sound association with round, which also influenced the spelling of the English word from 17c. Related: Surrounded; surrounding.

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flood (v.)
1660s, "to overflow" (transitive), from flood (n.). Intransitive sense "to rise in a flood" is from 1755. Related: Flooded; flooding.
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brim (v.)
"to fill to the brim," 1610s, from brim (n.). Intransitive sense ("be full to the brim") attested from 1818. To brim over "overflow" is from 1825. Related: Brimmed; brimming.
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ebullience (n.)
1749, from Latin ebullientem (nominative ebulliens) "a boiling, a bursting forth, overflow," present participle of ebullire "to boil over" (see ebullient). Related: Ebulliency (1670s), ebullition (c. 1400).
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blubber (v.)
"to cry, to overflow with weeping" (usually disparaging), c. 1400, from blubber (n.). In Middle English also "to seethe, bubble" (late 14c.). Related: Blubbered; blubbering.
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redundance (n.)

1610s, "superfluity, overabundance," from Latin redundantia "an overflowing, superfluity, excess," from redundare "overflow, pour over; be in excess" (see redundant). Meaning "that which is redundant" emerged by 1788.

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inundate (v.)
1620s, back-formation from inundation, or else from Latin inundatus, past participle of inundare "to overflow, run over" (source also of Spanish inundar, French inonder). Related: Inundated; inundating.
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