Etymology
Advertisement
overburden (v.)

also over-burden, "to put too much weight on, load with too great a burden," 1530s, from over- + burden (v.). Earliest uses are figurative. Related: Overburdened; overburdening.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
overcharge (v.)

c. 1300, overchargen, "to overload, overburden, load (something) too heavily," from over- + charge (v.). Meaning "to charge someone too much money, demand an excessive price from" is from 1660s. Related: Overcharged; overcharging.

Related entries & more 
surcharge (v.)
early 15c., "overcharge, charge too much expense," from Old French surcharger "to overload, overburden, overcharge" (12c.), from sur- "over" (see sur- (1)) + chargier "to load" (see charge (v.)). Meaning "make an extra charge on" is from 1885. The noun is also first attested early 15c. Related: Surcharged; surcharging.
Related entries & more 
overlay (v.)

"to cover the surface of (something)," c. 1300, in part from Old English oferlecgan "to place over," also "to overburden," and in part from over- + lay (v.). There also was an overlie in Middle English, but it merged into this word. Similar compounds are found in other Germanic languages, such as German überlegen, Dutch overlegen, Gothic ufarlagjan. Related: Overlaid; overlaying.

Related entries & more 
oppress (v.)

late 14c., oppressen, "to press unduly upon or against, overburden, weigh down," also figuratively, "overwhelm overpower" (of sickness, grief, etc.); also "burden with cruel, unjust, or unreasonable restraints, treat with injustice or undue severity, keep down by an unjust exercise of power," from Old French opresser "oppress, afflict; torment, smother" (13c.), from Medieval Latin oppressare, frequentative of Latin opprimere "press against, press together, press down;" figuratively "crush, put down, subdue, prosecute relentlessly" (in Late Latin "to rape"), from assimilated form of ob "against" (see ob-) + premere "to press, hold fast, cover, crowd, compress" (from PIE root *per- (4) "to strike"). In Middle English also "to rape." Related: Oppressed; oppressing.

It is the due [external] restraint and not the moderation of rulers that constitutes a state of liberty; as the power to oppress, though never exercised, does a state of slavery. [St. George Tucker, "View of the Constitution of the United States," 1803]
Related entries & more 
Advertisement