Etymology
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outweigh (v.)

"exceed in weight, be heavier than," also figurative, "surpass in gravity or importance," 1590s, from out- + weigh (v.). Related: Outweighed; outweighing.

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preponderant (adj.)

"of greater weight or influence," mid-15c., from Latin praeponderantem (nominative praeponderans), present participle of praeponderare "outweigh; make heavier" (see preponderate). Related: Preponderantly.

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preponderate (v.)

1610s, "to weigh more than," from Latin praeponderatus, past participle of praeponderare "outweigh, make heavier," from prae "before" (see pre-) + ponderare "to weigh," from pondus "weight," from stem of pendere "to hang, cause to hang; weigh" (from PIE root *(s)pen- "to draw, stretch, spin").

Intransitive sense is from 1620s. Meaning "to exceed in force or power" is from 1799. In 17c. English had a verb preponder "outweigh in importance," but it seems not to have survived. Related: Preponderating; preponderation.

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