Etymology
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outsmart (v.)

"to prove too clever for, get the better of by craft or ingenuity," 1926, from out- + smart (adj.). Related: Outsmarted; outsmarting.

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psych (v.)

by 1914 as "to subject to psychoanalysis," short for psychoanalyze. From 1934 as "to outsmart" (also psych out), and by 1952 in bridge as "make a bid meant to deceive an opponent." From 1963 as "to unnerve." However to psych (oneself) up is from 1972; to be psyched up "stimulate (oneself), prepare mentally for a special effort" is attested from 1968.

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