Etymology
Advertisement
our (pron.)

Old English ure "of us, pertaining to or belonging to us," genitive plural of the first person pronoun, from Proto-Germanic *ons (source also of Old Saxon usa, Old Frisian use, Old High German unsar, German unser, Gothic unsar "our"), from PIE *nes-, oblique case of personal pronoun in first person plural (source of Latin nos "we," noster "our"). Also compare ours.

Ourselves (late 15c.) "we or us, not others," modeled on yourselves, replaced original construction we selfe, us selfum, etc. It often is added to we for emphasis.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
ours (pron.)

"that or those belonging to us," c. 1300, oures, a double possessive (with genitive suffix -s (1)), originating in northern England, it has taken over the absolute function of our (q.v.). In Middle English ourn, ouren also were used.

Ours is a later possessive form from our, and is used in place of our and a noun, thus standing to our in the same relation as hers to her, yours to your, mine to my .... [Century Dictionary]
Related entries & more 
Nostratic (adj.)

pertaining to a proposed meta-family of languages including Indo-European, Semitic, Altaic, and Dravidian, 1966 (Nostratian is from 1931), from Latin nostratis "of our country," from nostras "our countrymen," plural of nostrum, neuter of noster "our," from nos "we" (from PIE *nes- (2); see us).

Related entries & more 
buss (v.)

"to kiss," 1570s, from buss (n.). Related: Bussed; bussing.

Kissing and bussing differ both in this,
We busse our wantons, but our wives we kisse.
[Robert Herrick, "Hesperides," 1648]
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
besmirch (v.)

"to soil with soot or mud, to sully," now usually figurative, 1590s, from be- + smirch.

Our Gayness and our Gilt are all besmyrcht. ["Henry V," IV.iii.110]

Related: Besmirched; besmirching.

Related entries & more 
segregation (n.)

1550s, "act of segregating," from Late Latin segregationem (nominative segregatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of segregare (see segregate). Meaning "state of being segregated" is from 1660s. Specific U.S. sense of "enforced separation of races" is attested from 1883.

Rarely are we met with a challenge, not to our growth or abundance, or our welfare or our security, but rather to the values and the purposes and the meaning of our beloved nation. The issue of equal rights for American Negroes is such an issue. And should we defeat every enemy, and should we double our wealth and conquer the stars, and still be unequal to this issue, then we will have failed as a people and as a nation. [Lyndon Johnson, speech introducing Voting Rights Act, March 15, 1965]
Related entries & more 
Liebfraumilch (n.)
German white wine, 1833, from German, literally "milk of Our Lady."
Related entries & more 
sobeit (conj.)
1580s, from so be it, "one of our few surviving subjunctives" [Weekley].
Related entries & more 
nobis 

"with us, for our part," Latin dative of nos "we" (from PIE *nos; see us).

Related entries & more