Etymology
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originate (v.)

1650s, "to trace the origin of;" also "to bring into existence, give rise or origin to," probably a back-formation from origination. Intransitive sense of "to arise, come into existence" is from 1775. Related: Originated; originating.

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originator (n.)

"an initiator, a creator, one who begins or originates (something)," 1818, agent noun in Latin form from originate.

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author (v.)
1590s, "to do, originate," from author (n.). Revived 1940s, chiefly U.S. Related: Authored; authoring.
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provenance (n.)

"origin, source or quarter from which anything comes," 1785, from French provenance "origin, production," from provenant, present participle of provenir "come forth, arise, originate," from Latin provenire "come forth, originate, appear, arise," from pro "forth" (see pro-) + venire "to come" (from a suffixed form of PIE root *gwa- "to go, come"). Often in italics well into 19c.; the English form is provenience.

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initiation (n.)

1580s, from French initiation or directly from Latin initiationem (nominative initiatio) "participation in secret rites," noun of action from past-participle stem of initiare "originate, initiate," from initium "a beginning" (see initial (adj.)).

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descend (v.)

c. 1300, descenden, "move or pass from a higher to a lower place," from Old French descendre (10c.) "descend, dismount; fall into; originate in" and directly from Latin descendere "come down, descend, sink," from de "down" (see de-) + scandere "to climb," from PIE root *skand- "jump" (see scan (v.)).

Sense of "originate, proceed from a source or original" is late 14c. in English, as is that of "have a downward slope." Meaning "come down in a hostile manner, invade" is from early 15c. Related: Descended; descending.

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incipient (adj.)
"beginning, commencing," 1660s, from Latin incipientem (nominative incipiens), present participle of incipere "begin, take up; have a beginning, originate," from in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + -cipere, combining form of capere "to take," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp." Related: Incipiently.
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thalamus (n.)
plural thalami, 1753, "the receptacle of a flower," Modern Latin, from Latin thalamus "inner chamber, sleeping room" (hence, figuratively, "marriage, wedlock"), from Greek thalamos "inner chamber, bedroom," related to thalame "den, lair," tholos "vault, vaulted building." Used in English since 1756 of a part of the forebrain where a nerve appears to originate.
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Cracow 

the older Englishing of Krakow, the city in Poland. The long-toed, pointed shoes or boots called crakows that were popular in England 15c. are attested from late 14c., so called because they were supposed to originate there. They also yielded a Middle English verb, crakouen "to provide (shoes or boots) with long, pointed toes" (early 15c.). Related: Cracovian.

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arise (v.)
Old English arisan "to get up from sitting, kneeling, or lying; have a beginning, come into being or action, spring from, originate; spring up, ascend" (cognate with Old Saxon arisan, Gothic urreisan), from a- (1) "of" + rise (v.). Mostly replaced by rise except in reference to circumstances; formerly the choice between the two often was made merely for the sake of rhythm.
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