Etymology
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presentation (n.)

late 14c., presentacioun, "act of presenting, ceremonious giving of a gift, prize, etc.," from Old French presentacion (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin praesentationem (nominative praesentatio) "a placing before," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin praesentare "to present, show, exhibit," literally "to place before," from stem of praesens (see present (adj.)).

The meaning "that which is offered or presented" is from mid-15c.; that of "a theatrical or other representation" is recorded from c. 1600. Related: Presentational.

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oral (adj.)

1620s, "uttered by the mouth or in words;" 1650s, "of or pertaining to the mouth," from Late Latin oralis, from Latin os (genitive oris) "mouth, opening, face, entrance," from PIE *os- "mouth" (source also of Sanskrit asan "mouth," asyam "mouth, opening," Avestan ah-, Hittite aish, Middle Irish a "mouth," Old Norse oss "mouth of a river," Old English or "beginning, origin, front").

Os was the usual word for "mouth" in Latin, but as the vowel distinction was lost it became similar in sound to os "bone" (see osseous). Thus bucca, originally "cheek" but used colloquially as "mouth," became the usual word for "mouth" (see bouche).

The psychological meaning "of the mouth as the focus of infantile sexual energy" (as in oral fixation) is attested from 1910. The sex-act sense is first recorded 1948, in Kinsey. As a noun, "oral examination," attested from 1876. Related: Orally (c. 1600); orality. 

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re-presentation (n.)

"a presenting again, a renewed presentation," 1805, from re- "back, again" + presentation or else a noun formed to go with re-present. With hyphenated spelling and full pronunciation of the prefix to distinguish it from representation.

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dumb-show (n.)

1560s, "pantomime dramatic presentation," from dumb (adj.) + show (n.).

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nouvelle cuisine 

style of cooking emphasizing freshness and attractive presentation, 1975, French, literally "new cooking."

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parol (n.)

"oral statement, something said or spoken," late 15c., from Anglo-French (14c.), from Old French parole "word, speech, argument" (see parole (n.)). As an adjective, "verbal, oral," from c. 1600.

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spoken (adj.)
"uttered, oral" (as opposed to written), 1837, past-participle adjective from speak (v.).
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missus (n.)

also missis, a colloquial contraction of mistress; as the oral form of Mrs., from 1790; the missus "the wife" is attested by 1833.

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advowson (n.)

"right of presentation to an ancient benefice," c. 1300, from Anglo-French advouison, Old French avoeson, from Latin advocationem (see advocation).

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viewing (n.)
1540s, "inspection," verbal noun from view (v.). From 1944 as "last presentation of a dead body before the funeral" (earlier viewing (of) the remains, 1920); from 1959 as "the watching of television."
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