Etymology
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opening (n.)

Old English openung "act of making open" (a door, mouth, etc.), "disclosure, manifestation," verbal noun from present participle of open (v.). Meaning "vacant space, hole, aperture, doorway" is attested from c. 1200. Meaning "act of opening (a place, to the public)" is from late 14c.  Sense of "opportunity, chance" is from 1793. Sense of "action of beginning (something)" is from 1712; meaning "first performance of a play" is 1855; that of "start of an art exhibit" is from 1905. Opening night is attested from 1814.

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open (v.)

Old English openian "to open, open up, cause to open, disclose, reveal," also intransitive, "become manifest, be open to or exposed to," from Proto-Germanic *opanojan (source also of Old Saxon opanon, Old Norse opna "to open," Middle Dutch, Dutch openen, Old High German offanon, German öffnen), from the source of open (adj.), but etymology suggests the adjective is older. Transitive sense of "set in action, begin, commence" is from 1690s. Open up (intrans.) in the figurative sense "cease to be secretive" is from 1921. Related: Opened; opening.

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orifice (n.)

"an opening, a mouth or aperture," early 15c., from Old French orifice "the opening of a wound" (14c.) and directly from Late Latin orificium "an opening," literally "mouth-making," from Latin os (genitive oris) "mouth" (see oral) + combining form of facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Related: Orificial.

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ostomy (n.)

"surgical operation making a permanent opening in the body," 1957, abstracted from colostomy, etc.; ultimately from Modern Latin stoma "opening, orifice," from Greek stoma "mouth" (see stoma).

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tracheostomy (n.)
1726, from tracheo-, used as a combining form of trachea + -ostomy "artificial opening," from Modern Latin stoma "opening, orifice," from Greek stoma "mouth" (see stoma).
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colostomy (n.)

1888, from combining form of colon (n.2) + Modern Latin -stoma "opening, orifice," from Greek stoma "opening, mouth" (see stoma). Colotomy "operation of making an incision in the colon" is attested from 1860, from Greek tome "a cutting."

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overture (n.)

mid-13c., "an opening, an aperture;" early 15c. as "an introductory proposal, something offered to open the way to some conclusion," from Old French overture "opening; proposal" (Modern French ouverture), from Latin apertura "opening," from aperire "to open, uncover" (see overt).

The orchestral sense of "a movement serving as a prelude or introduction to an extended work" in English is recorded from 1660s.

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can-opener (n.)
"instrument for opening one end of a sealed tin can," 1868, from can (n.) + opener.
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aperture (n.)

early 15c. (Chaulisc), "an opening, hole, orifice," from Latin apertura "an opening," from apertus, past participle of aperire "to open, uncover," from PIE compound *ap-wer-yo- from *ap- "off, away" (see apo-) + root *wer- (4) "to cover." In optics, "the diameter of the exposed part of a telescope, microscope, etc.," from 1660s.

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breach (v.)
"make a breach or opening in," 1570s, from breach (n.). Related: Breached; breaching.
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