Etymology
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offering (n.)

Middle English offring, from late Old English offrung "the presenting of something to a deity; a thing so presented," verbal noun from offrian "to show, exhibit; to bring an oblation" (see offer (v.)). Of presentations to a person, from mid-15c.; to the public (entertainment, a publication, items for sale, etc.), from 1834.

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offer (n.)

early 15c., offre, "a proposal presented for acceptance or rejection," from Old French ofre "act of offering; offer, proposition" (12c.), verbal noun from offrir "to offer," from Latin offerre "to present, bestow, bring before" (see offer (v.)). The native noun formation is offering. Meaning "act of proposing a price to obtain or do something" is from 1540s.

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offer (v.)

Middle English offeren, from Old English ofrian "to bring or put forward, to make a presentation, to show, exhibit;" also "to sacrifice, present something solemnly or worshipfully as a religious sacrifice, bring an oblation," from Latin offerre "to present, bestow, bring before" (in Late Latin "to present in worship"), from assimilated form of ob "to" (see ob-) + ferre "to bring, to carry," from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children."

From early 15c. as "to present (something) for acceptance or rejection." From 1530s as "to attempt to do." Commercial sense of "to expose for sale" is from 1630s. The Latin word was borrowed widely in Germanic languages in the religious sense via Christianity: Old Frisian offria, Middle Dutch offeren, Old Norse offra. The non-religious senses in English were from or reinforced by sense of Old French offrir "to offer," which is from Latin offerre. Related: Offered; offering.

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oblation (n.)

c. 1400, oblacioun, "an offering to a deity; a public ceremony of offering sacrifice; that which is sacrificed or solemnly offered to God," from Old French oblacion "offering, pious donation" and directly from Latin oblationem (nominative oblatio) "an offering, presenting, gift," in Late Latin "sacrifice," from Latin oblatus (see oblate (n.)). Related: Oblational; oblationary.

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lustrate (v.)
"purify by means of an offering," 1650s, from Latin lustratus, past participle of lustrare "purify ceremonially," from lustrum "purificatory sacrifice" (see lustrum) Related: Lustration (1610s).
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hopeless (adj.)
1560s, "offering no grounds for hope," from hope (n.) + -less. From 1580s as "having no expectation of success." Related: Hopelessly; hopelessness.
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prostitution (n.)

1530s, "act or practice of offering the body to indiscrimninate sexual intercourse for hire," from French prostitution and directly from Late Latin prostitutionem (nominative prostitutio) "prostitution," noun of action from past-participle stem of prostituere "to expose publicly to prostitution" (see prostitute (v.)). Figuratively (of abilities, etc.), "act of devoting or offering to a base or infamous use," by 1640s.

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sponsor (n.)

1650s, from Late Latin sponsor "sponsor in baptism," in Latin "a surety, guarantee, bondsman," from sponsus, past participle of spondere "give assurance, promise solemnly," from Proto-Italic *spondejo- "to pledge," literally "to libate many times," from PIE *spondeio- "to libate" (source also of Hittite ishpanti- "to bring a fluid sacrifice, pour;" Greek spendein "make a drink offering," spondē "libation, offering of wine;" compare spondee). Sense of "person who pays for a radio (or, after 1947, TV) program" is first recorded 1931.

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bribery (n.)
late 14c., "theft, robbery, swindling, pilfering," from Old French briberie (see bribe (n.) + -ery). Specifically "act of magistrates taking money for corrupted services" is from 1540s; sense of "offering of a bribe" is from 1560s.
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spondee (n.)

"metrical foot consisting of two long syllables," late 14c., from Old French spondee (14c.), from Latin spondeus, from Greek spondeios (pous), the name of the meter originally used in chants accompanying libations, from spondē  "solemn libation, a drink-offering," related to spendein "make a drink offering," from PIE root *spend- "to make an offering, perform a rite," hence "to engage oneself by a ritual act" (source also of Latin spondere "to engage oneself, promise," Hittite shipantahhi "I pour out a libation, I sacrifice"). Related: Spondaic.

And [the spondee] has the perpetual authority of correspondence with the deliberate pace of Man, and expression of his noblest animal character in erect and thoughtful motion : all the rhythmic art of poetry having thus primary regard to the great human noblesse of walking on feet ; and by no means referring itself to any other manner of progress by help either of stilts or steam. [John Ruskin, "Elements of English Prosody, for use in St. George's Schools," 1880]
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