Etymology
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occurrence (n.)

"that which presents itself, that which happens without design or expectation," 1530s, from French occurrence "unexpected happening" or directly from Medieval Latin occurrentia, from Latin occurentem (nominative occurens), present participle of occurrere (see occur). The adjective occurrent "occurring, happening, incidental" (mid-15c.) is long obsolete.

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reoccurrence (n.)

also re-occurrence, "a further occurrence," 1804; see re- "again" + occurrence. Also compare recurrence.

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contingencies (n.)

"unexpected additional expenses," 1660s, from contingency in the "chance occurrence" sense.

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premorbid (adj.)

also pre-morbid, "preceding the occurrence of symptoms or disease," 1905, from pre- "before" + morbid.

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eventuality (n.)

1759, "a possible occurrence," from eventual + -ity, on model of French éventualité.

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haplology (n.)

"omission of one occurrence of a sound or syllable that is repeated in a word," 1893; see haplo- + -logy.

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frequence (n.)

1530s, "an assembling in large numbers," from French fréquence, from Latin frequentia "an assembling in great numbers" (see frequent). From c. 1600 as "frequent occurrence."

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synchrony (n.)

"occurrence or existence at the same time," 1848, from Greek synkhronos (see synchronous) + -y (2).

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omen (n.)

"casual event or occurrence supposed to portend good or evil," 1580s, from Latin omen "foreboding, augury," according to Varro from Old Latin osmen; a word of unknown origin.

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emergency (n.)

"unforeseen occurrence requiring immediate attention," 1630s, from Latin emergens, present participle of emergere "to rise out or up" (see emerge). Or from emerge + -ency. As an adjective by 1881.

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