Etymology
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license (v.)

c. 1400, "grant formal authorization to do what would be illegal to do without it," from licence (n.), which see for the modern attempt at differentiation of spelling. Related: Licensed; Licensing.

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occupation (n.)

early 14c., "fact of holding or possessing;" mid-14c., "a being employed in something," also "a particular action," from Old French occupacion "pursuit, work, employment; occupancy, occupation" (12c.), from Latin occupationem (nominative occupatio) "a taking possession; business, employment," noun of action from past-participle stem of occupare (see occupy). Meaning "employment, business in which one engages" is late 14c. That of "condition of being held and ruled by troops of another country" is from 1940.

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licensed (adj.)
1590s, "given privilege or free range," past-participle adjective from license (v.). Meaning "having been granted a license" is from 1630s.
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licensee (n.)
"one to whom a licence is granted," 1837, from license (v.) + -ee.
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licensure (n.)
"a licensing, the granting of a licence," 1808, from license (v.) + -ure.
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unlicensed (adj.)
1630s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of license (v.).
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occupational (adj.)

"of or pertaining to a particular occupation, calling, or trade," 1850, from occupation + -al (1). Occupational therapy is attested by 1918; occupational risk by 1951. Related: Occupationally.

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dog-tag (n.)

"soldier's identity disk," 1918, U.S. slang, from dog (n.) + tag (n.1). So called perhaps from resemblance to the identification/license tag on dog collars.

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kibitzer (n.)

"one who looks on at card games and offers unwelcome advice," 1915, from Yiddish, agent noun from kibitz (q.v.). "Der Kibitzer" is noted as the name of a Yiddish humorous weekly published in New York from 1908-1912. ["The Jewish Press in New York City," 1918]

LICENSE TO "KIBITZ"
"This license entitles bearer to 'kibitz'; to sit near any table of players; to criticize, knock, boost or do anything that will abuse players.
"If a man makes a wrong play it is up to the 'kibitzer' to correct him, and the 'kibitzer' will be held personally responsible should the player lose, and this license will be forfeited.
"Any licensed 'kibitzer' not abiding by above rules and regulations Will be subject to fine or imprisonment."
[notice said to have been posed on the bulletin board of the club room of the Associated Traveling Salesmen of New York, quoted in The Clothier and Furnisher, March 1915]
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profession (n.)

c. 1200, professioun, "vows taken upon entering a religious order," from Old French profession (12c.) and directly from Latin professionem (nominative professio) "public declaration," noun of action from past-participle stem of profiteri "declare openly" (see profess).

The meaning "any solemn declaration" is from mid-14c. Meaning "occupation one professes to be skilled in, a calling" is from early 15c.; meaning "body of persons engaged in some occupation" is from 1610; as a euphemism for "prostitution" (compare oldest profession) it is recorded from 1888.

Formerly theology, law, and medicine were specifically known as the professions; but, as the applications of science and learning are extended to other departments of affairs, other vocations also receive the name. The word implies professed attainments in special knowledge, as distinguished from mere skill; a practical dealing with affairs, as distinguished from mere study or investigation; and an application of such knowledge to uses for others as a vocation, as distinguished from its pursuit for one's own purposes. In professions strictly so called a preliminary examination as to qualifications is usually demanded by law or usage, and a license or other official authority founded thereon required. [Century Dictionary]
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