Etymology
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occupation (n.)

early 14c., "fact of holding or possessing;" mid-14c., "a being employed in something," also "a particular action," from Old French occupacion "pursuit, work, employment; occupancy, occupation" (12c.), from Latin occupationem (nominative occupatio) "a taking possession; business, employment," noun of action from past-participle stem of occupare (see occupy). Meaning "employment, business in which one engages" is late 14c. That of "condition of being held and ruled by troops of another country" is from 1940.

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occupational (adj.)

"of or pertaining to a particular occupation, calling, or trade," 1850, from occupation + -al (1). Occupational therapy is attested by 1918; occupational risk by 1951. Related: Occupationally.

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cabinet-maker (n.)
"one whose occupation is the making of household furniture," 1680s, from cabinet + maker.
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dressmaker (n.)

also dress-maker, "one whose occupation is the making of articles of feminine attire," 1803, from dress (n.) + maker.

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bookbinder (n.)
"one whose occupation is the binding of books," late 14c, from book (n.) + binder. Related: Bookbindery.
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preoccupancy (n.)

also pre-occupancy, "prior occupation, act of taking possession before another," 1734, from pre- "before" + occupancy.

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saunter (n.)

"a leisurely stroll, a ramble," 1828, from saunter (v.). Earlier it meant "idle occupation, diversion" (1728); "leisurely, careless way of walking" (1712).

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salesman (n.)

"one whose occupation is the selling of goods, services, or merchandise," 1520s, from man (n.) + sales (q.v.), genitive of sale (n.). Compare craftsman, tradesman.

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chimney-sweep (n.)

"one whose occupation is the clearing of soot from chimneys," 1727, from their cry (attested from 1610s); see chimney + sweep (v.). The earlier noun was chimney-sweeper (c. 1500).

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copyist (n.)

"one whose occupation is to transcribe documents," 1690s, from copy (n.) + -ist. Earlier was copist (1580s).

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