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22 entries found.
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occipital (adj.)

"of, on, or in the back of the head," 1540s, from French occipital, from Medieval Latin occipitalis, from Latin occiput (genitive occipitis) "back of the skull," from assimilated form of ob "in the way of, against," here with a sense of "in back of" (see ob-) + caput "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head"). As a noun, "the occipital bone," from 1758. Middle English had occiput (n.) "back of the head" and occipiciale (n.) "occipital bone."

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protuberance (n.)

1640s, "a swelling tumor on the body; anything swelled or pushed beyond the surrounding or adjacent surface," from Late Latin protuberantem (nominative protuberans), present participle of protuberare "to swell, bulge, grow forth," from Latin pro "forward" (see pro-) + tuber "lump, swelling" (from PIE root *teue- "to swell"). Meaning "fact or condition of swelling or pushing beyond the surrounding or adjacent surface" is by 1680s. Related: Protuberancy.

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bleb (n.)
c. 1600, "blister or swelling," imitative. Also used for "bubble" (1640s), "protuberance on a cell surface" (1962). Compare blob. "In relation to blob, bleb expresses a smaller swelling" [OED].
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bum (n.1)
"buttocks," late 14c., "probably onomatopœic, to be compared with other words of similar sound and with the general sense of 'protuberance, swelling.' " [OED]
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nub (n.)

"knob, lump, bump, protuberance," 1590s, variant of dialectal knub, which is probably a variant of knob. Figurative meaning "point, gist" is attested by 1834.

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boss (n.2)
"protuberance, button," c. 1300, from Old French boce "a hump, swelling, tumor" (12c., Modern French bosse), from either Frankish *botija or Vulgar Latin *bottia, both of uncertain origin.
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papilla (n.)

plural papillae, 1690s, "a nipple of a mammary gland," from Latin papilla "nipple," diminutive of papula "swelling" (see pap (n.2)). Meaning "nipple-like protuberance" attested from 1713.

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bump (n.)
1590s, "protuberance caused by a blow;" 1610s as "a dull-sounding, solid blow;" see bump (v.). The dancer's bump and grind attested from 1940. To be like a bump on a log "silent, stupidly inarticulate" is by 1863, American English.
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knapweed (n.)
so called for its knobby heads, from Middle English knap "ornamental knob; bunch or tuft; a button; knot or protuberance on a tree; joint in the stalk of a plant; testicle," from Old English cnæp "top, summit of a hill," or its cognate, Old Norse knappr "a knob, button, stud."
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bunch (n.)
mid-14c., "a bundle;" late 14c., "protuberance on the body, swelling, knob, lump," probably from Old French dialectal bonge "bundle," a nasalized form of Old French bouge (2), 15c., from Flemish bondje diminutive of boud "bundle." The sense of "a cluster, joined collection of things of the same kind" is from mid-15c. The looser meaning "a lot, a group of any kind" is from 1620s.
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