Etymology
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normal (adj.)

c. 1500, "typical, common;" 1640s, in geometry, "standing at a right angle, perpendicular," from Late Latin normalis "in conformity with rule, normal," in classical Latin "made according to a carpenter's square," from norma "rule, pattern," literally "carpenter's square," a word of unknown origin (see norm). Meaning "conforming to common standards or established order or usage, regular, usual" is attested from 1828 but probably is older than the record [Barnhart].

Meaning "heterosexual" is by 1914. As a noun meaning "usual state or condition," from 1890 (in geometry as "a perpendicular" from 1727). Sense of "a normal person or thing" is attested by 1894. Normal school "training college for teachers" (1835) is a translation of French école normale (1794), a creation of the French Republic; the notion is of "serving to set a standard." The U.S. city of Normal, Illinois, was named 1857 for the normal school established there.

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norepinephrine (n.)
1868, from normal (in reference to molecular structure) + epinephrine.
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subnormal (adj.)
1875, from sub- + normal. The noun is from 1710 in geometry; 1916, of persons.
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lowing (n.)
the normal bellowing of cattle, early 13c., verbal noun from low (v.).
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paranormal (adj.)

1905, in reference to observed events or things presumed to operate by natural laws but not conforming to those known or normal, from para- (1) + normal. Related: Paranormally.

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overproduction (n.)

also over-production, "excessive production, production of commodities in excess of normal demand," 1822, from over- + production.

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Maori (n.)

"Polynesian inhabitant of New Zealand," 1843, native name, said to mean "normal, natural, ordinary, of the usual kind." As an adjective by 1849.

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oversized (adj.)

"over or above the normal size," 1788, past-participle adjective from oversize "make too large" (1670s), from over- + size (v.).

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normalize (v.)

"reduce to a standard; cause to conform to a standard," 1848, from normal + -ize. Related: Normalized; normalizing.

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off-duty (adj.)

"not employed or occupied with one's normal work," 1743, from off (prep.) + duty.

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