Etymology
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expense (v.)

"offset (an expenditure) against an income," 1909, from expense (n.). Related: Expensed; expensing.

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cash (n.)

1590s, "money box;" also "money in hand, coin," from French caisse "money box" (16c.), from Provençal caissa or Italian cassa, from Latin capsa "box" (see case (n.2)); originally the money box, but by 18c. the secondary sense of the money in it became sole meaning.

Like many financial terms in English (bankrupt, etc.), it has an Italian heritage. Not related to (but influencing the form of) the colonial British cash "Indian monetary system, Chinese coin, etc.," which is from Tamil kasu, Sanskrit karsha, Sinhalese kasi.

Cash-crop "agricultural product grown to sell for profit" is attested from 1831; cash-flow from 1954; the mechanical cash-register "machine for automatically recording the sums of money deposited in it" is from 1875. 

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expense (n.)

also formerly expence, late 14c., "action of spending or giving away, a laying out or expending," also "funds provided for expenses, expense money; damage or loss from any cause," from Anglo-French expense, Old French espense "money provided for expenses," from Late Latin expensa "disbursement, outlay, expense," noun use of neuter plural past participle of Latin expendere "weigh out money, pay down," from ex "out, out of" (see ex-) + pendere "to hang, cause to hang; weigh; pay" (from PIE root *(s)pen- "to draw, stretch, spin"). For the financial sense of the Latin verb, see pound (n.1). 

Latin spensa also yielded Medieval Latin spe(n)sa, the sense of which specialized to "outlay for provisions," then "provisions, food" before it was borrowed into Old High German as spisa and became the root of German Speise "food," now mostly meaning prepared food, and speisen "to eat." Expense account is from 1872.

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cash (v.)

"convert (a check, etc.) to cash," 1811, from cash (n.). Encash (1865) also was sometimes used. Related: Cashed; cashing.

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non- 

a prefix used freely in English and meaning "not, lack of," or "sham," giving a negative sense to any word, 14c., from Anglo-French noun-, from Old French non-, from Latin non "not, by no means, not at all, not a," from Old Latin noenum "not one" (*ne oinom, from PIE root *ne- "not" + PIE root *oi-no- "one, unique"). In some cases perhaps from Middle English non "not" (adj.), from Old English nan (see not). "It differs from un- in that it denotes mere negation or absence of the thing or quality, while un- often denotes the opposite of the thing or quality" [Century Dictionary].

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non-com 

also noncom, by 1817, short for non-commissioned(officer).

The "non-coms" — non-commissioned, meaning, not non compos; though evil-minded high privates declare it might well mean that — have assigned to them an upper cabin, with staterooms, over the quarters of the officers, in the after-part of the ship. [James K. Hosmer, "The Color-Guard," Boston, 1864]
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non-perishable (adj.)

also nonperishable, "not subject to rapid decay or deterioration," 1887, from non- + perishable.

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non-sectarian (adj.)

also nonsectarian, "not involving or relating to a specific religious sect," 1825, from non- + sectarian.

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non-vascular (adj.)

also nonvascular, "lacking vessels for the circulation of fluid," 1815, from non- + vascular.

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non-Euclidean 

"not in accordance with the principles of Euclid," 1874, from non- + Euclidean.

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