Etymology
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neologism (n.)

1772 (in a translation from French), "practice of innovation in language, the use of new words or old words in new senses," from French néologisme (18c.), from neo- "new" (see neo-) + Greek logos "word" (see Logos) + -ism. Meaning "new word or expression" is from 1803. Neological "characterized by new words or phrases" is attested from 1754. Related: Neologically.

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*leg- (1)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak" on the notion of "to gather words, to pick out words."

It forms all or part of: alexia; analects; analogous; analogue; analogy; anthology; apologetic; apologue; apology; catalogue; coil; colleague; collect; college; collegial; Decalogue; delegate; dialect; dialogue; diligence; doxology; dyslexia; eclectic; eclogue; elect; election; epilogue; hapax legomenon; homologous; horology; ideologue; idiolect; intelligence; lectern; lectio difficilior; lection; lector; lecture; leech (n.2) "physician;" legacy; legal; legate; legend; legible; legion; legislator; legitimate; lesson; lexicon; ligneous; ligni-; logarithm; logic; logistic; logo-; logogriph; logopoeia; Logos; -logue; -logy; loyal; monologue; neglect; neologism; philology; privilege; prolegomenon; prologue; relegate; sacrilege; select; syllogism; tautology; trilogy.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek legein "to say, tell, speak, declare; to count," originally, in Homer, "to pick out, select, collect, enumerate;" lexis "speech, diction;" logos "word, speech, thought, account;" Latin legere "to gather, choose, pluck; read," lignum "wood, firewood," literally "that which is gathered," legare "to depute, commission, charge," lex "law" (perhaps "collection of rules"); Albanian mb-ledh "to collect, harvest;" Gothic lisan "to collect, harvest," Lithuanian lesti "to pick, eat picking;" Hittite less-zi "to pick, gather."

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omnivore (n.)

"omnivorous animal or person," 1890 (as a dictionary word by 1846), formed from omnivorous on model of carnivore/carnivorous. French omnivore was noted as a neologism in that language in 1801 and might be the direct source of the English word.

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ataraxia (n.)

often Englished as ataraxy, c. 1600, "calmness, impassivity," a term used by stoics and skeptics, from Modern Latin, from Greek ataraxia "impassiveness," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + tarassein (Attic tarattein) "to disturb, confuse" (from PIE root *dhrehgh- "to confuse"). It seems to have been disused; when ataraxia appeared in print in English in 1858 it was regarded as a neologism.

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strenuous (adj.)

"characterized by great effort," mid-15c. (implied in strenuously), from Latin strenuus "active, brisk, quick, nimble, prompt, vigorous, keen." Probably cognate with Greek strēnes, strēnos "keen, strong," strenos "arrogance, eager desire," Old English stierne "hard, severe, keen" (see stern (adj.)). Mocked by Ben Jonson as a pedantic neologism in "Poetaster" (1601). Sense of "requiring much energy" is first recorded 1670s. Related: Strenuousness; strenuosity.

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