Etymology
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furze (n.)

type of evergreen shrub abundant in English heaths, Old English fyrs "furze, gorse, bramble," a word of unknown origin. Related: Furzy.

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needle (n.)

Old English nædl "small, pointed instrument for carrying a thread through woven fabric, leather, etc.," from Proto-Germanic *næthlo (source also of Old Saxon nathla, Old Norse nal, Old Frisian nedle, Old High German nadala, German Nadel, Gothic neþla "needle"), literally "a tool for sewing," from PIE *net-la-, from root *(s)ne- "to sew, to spin" (source also of Sanskrit snayati "wraps up," Greek nein "to spin," Latin nere "to spin," German nähen "to sew," Old Church Slavonic niti "thread," Old Irish snathat "needle," Welsh nyddu "to sew," nodwydd "needle") + instrumental suffix *-tla.

To seke out one lyne in all hys bookes wer to go looke a nedle in a meadow. [Thomas More, c. 1530]

Meaning "piece of magnetized steel in a compass" is from late 14c. (on a dial or indicator from 1928); the surgical instrument so called from 1727; phonographic sense from 1902; sense of "leaf of a fir or pine tree" first attested 1797. Needledom "the world of sewing" is from 1847. Needle's eye, figurative of a minute opening, often is a reference to Matthew xix.24.

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needle (v.)

1715, "to sew or pierce with a needle," from needle (n.). Meaning "goad, provoke" (1881) probably is from earlier meaning "haggle in making a bargain" (1812). Needler, in addition to "maker or seller of needles" (late 14c.) meant "a sharp bargainer, thrifty person" (1829). Related: Needled; needling.

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pine-needle (n.)

"acicular leaf of the pine tree," 1834, from pine (n.) + needle (n.).

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needlepoint (n.)

c. 1700, "the point of a needle;" 1865, "point lace made with the needle," 1865, from needle (n.) + point (n.).

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needlework (n.)

"sewing, embroidery, etc.; work produced by means of the needle," late 14c., from needle (n.) + work (n.).

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thread (v.)

"to put thread through a needle," mid-14c., from thread (n.); in reference to film cameras from 1913. The dancing move called thread the needle is attested from 1844. Related: Threaded; threading.

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crochet (n.)

"kind of knitting done with a needle with a hook at one end," 1846, from French crochet "small hook; canine tooth" (12c.), diminutive of croc "hook," from Old Norse krokr "hook," which is of obscure origin but perhaps related to the widespread group of Germanic kr- words meaning "bent, hooked." So called for the hooked needle used. Crochet-needle is from 1848; crochet-work from 1856; crochet-hook from 1849.

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acupuncture (n.)

1680s, "pricking with a needle" as a surgical operation to ease pain, from Latin acus "a needle" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce") + puncture. The verb is recorded by 1972.

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aglet (n.)

also aiglet, "metal tag of a lace," meant to make it easier to thread through the eyelet-holes, but later often ornamental, mid-15c., from Old French aiguillette, diminutive of aiguille "needle," from Late Latin acucula, an extended form (via diminutive suffix, but not necessarily implying smallness) of Latin acus "a needle" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce"). Compare Italian agucchia, Portuguese agulha, Spanish aguja "needle."

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