Etymology
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naval (adj.)

"of or pertaining to a ship or ships," specifically "pertaining to a navy," early 15c., from Old French naval (14c.) and directly from Latin navalis "pertaining to a ship or ships," from navis "ship," from PIE root *nau- "boat." An Old English word for "naval" was scipherelic.

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shipyard (n.)

"plot of ground near the water on which ships are constructed," c. 1700, from ship (n.) + yard (n.1).

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Dahlgren (n.)

type of cast-iron smooth-bore naval artillery cannon, by 1854, named for its inventor, U.S. naval ordnance officer John A. Dahlgren (1809-1870), who was of Swedish ancestry.

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commission (v.)

1660s, "empower or authorize by commission," from commission (n.). In the naval sense, of persons, "be given the rank of an officer (by commission from authority)," from 1793; of a ship, "to be transferred from the naval yard and placed in the command of the officer put in charge of it," 1796. Related: Commissioned; commissioning.

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admiralty (n.)

"naval branch of the English executive," early 15c., admiralte, from Old French amiralte, from amirail (see admiral).

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bonkers (adj.)

"crazy," 1957, British slang, perhaps from earlier naval slang meaning "slightly drunk" (1948), from notion of a thump ("bonk") on the head.

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disarmament (n.)

"action of disarming," by 1795; see noun of action from disarm. Especially in reference to reduction of military and naval forces from a war to a peace footing.

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arms race (n.)

1930, in reference to naval build-ups, from arms (see arm (n.2)) + race (n.1). First used in British English.

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blue-jacket (n.)

also bluejacket, in the naval service, "a sailor" (as distinguished from a marine), 1830, from blue (adj.1) + jacket (n.).

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dockyard (n.)

"place for naval stores, timber, etc., near a harbor," 1704, from dock (n.1) + yard (n.1).

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