Etymology
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national (adj.)

"of or pertaining to a nation or a country regarded as a whole; established and maintained by the nation; peculiar to the whole people of a country," 1590s, from French national (16c., from Old French nacion), and also from nation + -al (1). Opposed to local or provincial (or in the U.S., state).

Meaning "peculiar or common to the whole people of a country" is by 1620s. From 1802 as "established and maintained by the nation or its laws." As a noun, "citizen of a (particular) nation," from 1887. Related: Nationally

National guard is from 1793, originally in reference to an armed force in France identified with the revolution; U.S. use is from 1847, originally a name sometimes given to the organized militia. National anthem is recorded by 1806. 

A King though he's pestered with cares,
    For the most part he's able to ban them;
But one comes in a shape he never can escape—
    The implacable National Anthem!
[W.S. Gilbert, "His Excellency," 1894] 
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health (n.)

Old English hælþ "wholeness, a being whole, sound or well," from Proto-Germanic *hailitho, from PIE *kailo- "whole, uninjured, of good omen" (source also of Old English hal "hale, whole;" Old Norse heill "healthy;" Old English halig, Old Norse helge "holy, sacred;" Old English hælan "to heal"). With Proto-Germanic abstract noun suffix *-itho (see -th (2)).

Of physical health in Middle English, but also "prosperity, happiness, welfare; preservation, safety." An abstract noun to whole, not to heal. Meaning "a salutation" (in a toast, etc.) wishing one welfare or prosperity is from 1590s. Health food is from 1848.

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health-care (n.)
also healthcare, 1915, from health + care (n.).
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supra-national (adj.)
also supranational, 1871 (T.H. Huxley), from supra- + national. Perhaps inspired by German supra-national (1865).
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sanity (n.)

early 15c., sanite, "healthy condition, health," a sense now obsolete, from Old French sanité "health," from Latin sanitatem (nominative sanitas) "health, soundness of body; sanity, soundness of mind; reason; correctness of speech;" from sanus "healthy; sane" (see sane). Meaning "soundness of mind" is attested from c. 1600.

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healthful (adj.)
late 14c., "wholesome, curative, saving, serving to promote health," from health + -ful. Meaning "free from disease, healthy" is attested from 1540s but is rare. Related: Healthfully; healthfulness.
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salubrious (adj.)

"favorable to health, wholesome," 1540s, from Latin salubris "promoting health, healthful," from salus (genitive salutis) "welfare, health" (from PIE root *sol- "whole, well-kept"). Originally of foods, medicine; in reference to air, climate, etc., by 1610s. Related: Salubriously; salubriousness.

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nationalization (n.)

1801, "act of rendering national in character," from nationalize + -ation. Meaning "act of bringing (property) under control of the national government" is by 1864.

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NAACP 

abbreviation of National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, first attested 1910. The organization was founded Feb. 12, 1909, as National Negro Committee.

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Canadianism (n.)
"national spirit of Canadians," 1875, from Canadian + -ism.
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