Etymology
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No results were found for nrem. Showing results for nem.
anomo- 
word-forming element meaning "irregular, unusual," from Greek anomos, from a- "without" (see a- (3)) + nomos "law," from PIE root *nem- "assign, allot; take."
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*nem- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "assign, allot; take."

It forms all or part of: agronomy; anomie; anomy; antinomian; antinomy; astronomer; astronomy; autonomous; autonomy; benumb; Deuteronomy; economy; enumerate; enumeration; gastronomy; heteronomy; innumerable; metronome; namaste; nemesis; nimble; nim; nomad; nomothetic; numb; numeracy; numeral; numerator; numerical; numerology; numerous; numismatic; supernumerary; taxonomy.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek nemein "to deal out," nemesis "just indignation;" Latin numerus "number;" Lithuanian nuoma "rent, interest;" Middle Irish nos "custom, usage;" German nehmen "to take."
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nomology (n.)

1825, "study of what relates to society" (obsolete); 1845, in philosophy, "science of the fundamental laws of thinking;" 1879, "science of law and legislation," from Greek nomos "usage, law, custom" (from PIE root *nem- "to assign, allot; to take") + -logy. Related: Nomologist; nomologistical.

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anomy (n.)
"lawlessness, violation of (divine) law," 1590s, Englished from French anomie, from Greek anomia "lawlessness," abstract noun from anomos "without law, lawless," from a- "without" (see a- (3)) + nomos "law," from PIE root *nem- "assign, allot; take."
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nemesis 

1570s, Nemesis, "Greek goddess of vengeance, personification of divine wrath," from Greek nemesis "just indignation, righteous anger," literally "distribution" (of what is due), related to nemein "distribute, allot, apportion one's due," from PIE root *nem- "assign, allot; take." The notion is "divine allotment to everyone of his share of fortune, good or bad." With a lower-case -n-, in the sense of "retributive justice," attested from 1590s. General sense of "anything by which it seems one must be defeated" is by 1930.

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namaste (n.)

1948, "salutatory gesture made by bringing the palms together and bowing," from Hindi, from Sanskrit namas "bowing" (from namas- "obeisance," from PIE root *nem- "assign, allot; take") + te, dative of tuam "you" (singular). Attested as a word of greeting by 1967.

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-nomy 

word-forming element, principally in the science, forming names of disciplines describing natural laws or scientific methods; from Greek -nomia "method," -nomos "managing," nomos "law, usage, custom," all from the verb nemein "to manage," from PIE root *nem- "assign, allot; take." 

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antinomy (n.)
1590s, "contradiction in the laws," from Latin antinomia, from Greek antinomia "ambiguity in the law," from anti "against" (see anti-) + nomos "law" (from PIE root *nem- "assign, allot; take"). From 1802 in the philosophical sense used by Kant, "contradiction between logical conclusions." Related: Antinomic.
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antinomian (n.)
"one who maintains that, by the dispensation of grace, the moral law is not binding on Christians," 1640s, from Medieval Latin Antinomi, name given to a sect of this sort that arose in Germany in 1535, from Greek anti "opposite, against" (see anti-) + nomos "rule, law," from PIE root *nem- "assign, allot; take." As an adjective from 1640s.
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autonomy (n.)
"autonomous condition, power or right of self-government," 1620s, of states, from Greek autonomia "independence," abstract noun from autonomos "independent, living by one's own laws," from autos "self" (see auto-) + nomos "custom, law" (from PIE root *nem- "assign, allot; take"). Of persons, from 1803. In Kantian metaphysics, "doctrine of the Will giving itself its own law, based on conscience."
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