Etymology
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muzzle (n.)

late 14c., mosel, "device put over an animal's mouth to stop it from biting, eating, or rooting," from Old French musel "muzzle," also "snout, nose" (12c., Modern French museau), from muse "muzzle," from Gallo-Roman *musa "snout" (source also of Provençal mus, Old Spanish mus, Italian muso), a word of unknown origin, possibly related to Latin morsus "bite" (but OED finds "serious difficulties" with this).

Meaning "projecting jaws and nose of the head of an animal" is from early 15c.; sense of "open end of a firearm" is recorded from 1560s. Muzzle-loader "gun loaded from the muzzle" (opposed to breech-loader) is by 1858.

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muzzle (v.)

"to put a muzzle on, bind or confine the mouth of to prevent from biting or eating," early 15c., moselen, from muzzle (n.). Figurative use, "to gag, silence," is from 1610s. Related: Muzzled; muzzling.

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unmuzzled (adj.)
c. 1600, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of muzzle (v.), or past participle of unmuzzle (v.), which is attested from c. 1600.
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musette (n.)

late 14c., "small bagpipe," from Old French musette "bagpipe" (13c.), from muser "to play the bagpipe, make music," from mus "mouth, muzzle," from Medieval Latin musum (see muzzle (n.)). By 1788 as "a composition for or as though for a musette," a quiet pastoral melody, usually in imitation of a bagpipe, from this sense in French.

MUSETTE. The name of an air generally written in common-time, and the character of which is always soft and sweet. From the style of this air, dances were formerly invented of a similar cast, and which were also called Musettes. Musette was also the name formerly given to a small kind of bagpipe much used in most countries of Europe, the performers on which were called Musars. [Thomas Busby, "A Complete Dictionary of Music," 1806]
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schnauzer (n.)

breed of terrier with a bearded muzzle, 1923, from German Schnauzer, literally "growler," from schnauzen "to snarl, growl," from Schnauze "snout, muzzle," which is related to Middle English snute, snoute "snout" (see snout).

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phimosis (n.)

"contraction of the preputial orifice," 1670s, from Greek phimosis, literally "muzzling," from phimos "a muzzle, a gag," a word of unexplained etymology.

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mull (n.)
"promontory" (in Scottish place names), late 14c., perhaps from Old Norse muli "a jutting crag, projecting ridge (between two valleys)," which probably is identical with muli "snout, muzzle." The Norse word is related to Old Frisian mula, Middle Dutch mule, muul, Old High German mula, German Maul "muzzle, mouth." Alternative etymology traces it to Gaelic maol "brow of a hill or rock," also "bald," from Old Celtic *mailo-s (source also of Irish maol, Old Irish máel, máil, Welsh moel).
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schnozz (n.)

"nose," 1942, from Yiddish shnoitsl, from German Schnauze "snout, muzzle," which is related to Middle English snute, snoute "snout" (see snout). Compare schnauzer.

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Spitz (n.)
breed of small Pomeranian dog, 1842, from German Spitz, Spitzhund, from spitz "pointed" (see spit (n.2)). So called from the tapering shape of its muzzle.
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groyne (n.)
"strong, low sea wall," 1580s, perhaps from obsolete groin "pig's snout" (c. 1300; the wall so called because it was thought to look like one), from Old French groin "muzzle, snout; promontory, jutting part," from Latin grunnire "to grunt" (compare English colloquial grunter "a pig").
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