Etymology
Advertisement
musician (n.)

late 14c., musicien, "one skilled in music," from Old French musicien (14c.), or a native formation from music + -ian. Sense of "professional musical performer" is attested from mid-15c.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
musicianship (n.)

"skill in musical composition or expression," 1828, from musician + -ship.

Related entries & more 
sideman (n.)
"supporting musician," 1936, from side (adj.) + man (n.). Earlier it meant "assistant to a church warden" (1560s).
Related entries & more 
musicaster (n.)

"mediocre musician," 1838, from music + -aster.

Related entries & more 
Boehm 
of key arrangements on a flute, 1845, in reference to the system invented 1832 by German musician Theobold Böhm (1794-1881). The surname is literally "a Bohemian."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
tuner (n.)
"one who tunes musical instruments," 1801, agent noun from tune (v.). From 1570s as "musician, singer." From 1909 as "device for varying the frequency of a radio or (later) television."
Related entries & more 
Braille (n., adj.)

"system of embossed printing used as an alphabet for the blind," 1853, from Louis Braille, French musician and teacher, blind from age 3, who devised it c. 1830.

Related entries & more 
dreamer (n.)

early 14c., "one who dreams," agent noun from dream (v.). Meaning "idler, daydreamer" emerged by late 14c. Old English dreamere meant "musician."

Related entries & more 
klezmer (n.)
(plural klezmorim), by 1913, originally, "itinerant East European Jewish professional musician," from Hebrew kley zemer, literally "vessels of song," thus "musical instruments." By 1966 in reference to an old style of Eastern European Jewish music or orchestras that played it.
Related entries & more 
traps (n.2)
"drums, cymbals, bells, etc.," 1925, from earlier trap drummer (1903) "street musician who plays a drum and several other instruments at once," perhaps from traps "belongings" (1813), shortened form of trappings.
Related entries & more