Etymology
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morph 

as a noun, in biology, "genetic variant of an animal," 1955; as a verb, in cinematic special effects, c. 1987, short for metamorphosis. Related: Morphed; morphing. Earlier it was a slang shortening of morphine (1912).

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morpho- 

before vowels morph-, word-forming element of Greek origin meaning "form, shape," from Greek morphē "form, shape; beauty, outward appearance," a word of uncertain etymology.

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endomorph (n.)

1940 as one of W.H. Sheldon's three types of human bodies, from endo- + -morph, from Greek morphē "form," a word of uncertain etymology. Earlier, "a mineral encased in the crystal of another mineral" (1874). Related: Endomorphic.

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biomorph (n.)

"a decorative form representing a living object," 1895 (A.C. Haddon), from bio- "life" + -morph "form," from Greek morphē "form, shape; beauty, outward appearance," a word of uncertain etymology. Related: Biomorphic.

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ectomorph (n.)

"person with a slim physique and an introverted, thoughtful personality," 1940, coined by American psychologist William H. Sheldon from ectoderm + -morph, from Greek morphē "form, shape; beauty, outward appearance," a word of uncertain etymology. So called for the embryonic ectoderm, which develops the nervous system. Related: Ectomorphic.

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mesomorph (n.)

"person with a powerful, compact body build," 1940, from mesoderm + -morph, from Greek morphe "form, shape; beauty, outward appearance," a word of uncertain etymology. Coined by American psychologist William H. Sheldon (1898-1977); the reference is to the mesodermal layer of the embryo, from which physical structures develop. Related: Mesomorphic (attested from 1923 in chemistry, a separate coinage in reference to a state of a liquid crystal).

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