Etymology
Advertisement
Monte Carlo 

resort town, capital of Monaco, Italian, literally "Charles's Mountain," founded 1866 and named for Charles III of Monaco (1818-1889). The car rally there dates to 1911. The Monte Carlo fallacy (by 1957) was named for the town's famous gambling casinos; it is the fallacy of thinking that the probability of a particular outcome rises with the successive number of opposite outcomes. Contrary to the Monte Carlo fallacy, if the roulette wheel stops on black 99 times in a row, the chances that the 100th spin will be red are still just under 50-50. 

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
monte (n.)

1824, the name of a favorite Spanish and Spanish-American card game played with a deck of 40 cards, from Spanish monte "mountain," from Latin montem (nominative mons) "mountain" (from PIE root *men- (2) "to project"). So called from the heap of cards left after dealing. Picked up by the Americans in Texas and in the Mexican War, it was a favorite in California during the gold rush years. The three-card confidence-game form (first attested 1877) is of Mexican origin.

Related entries & more 
fallacy (n.)
late 15c., "deception, false statement," from Latin fallacia "deception, deceit, trick, artifice," abstract noun from fallax (genitive fallacis) "deceptive," from fallere "deceive" (see fail (v.)). Specific sense in logic, "false syllogism, invalid argumentation," dates from 1550s. An earlier form was fallace (c. 1300), from Old French fallace.
Related entries & more 
Piedmont 

region in northern Italy, from Old Italian pie di monte "foot of the mountains," from pie "foot" (from Latin pes "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot") + monte "mountain" (from PIE root *men- (2) "to project"). Related: Piedmontese.

Related entries & more 
fallacious (adj.)
c. 1500, from fallacy (Latin fallacia) + -ous. Related: Fallaciously; fallaciousness.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
disabuse (v.)

"free from mistake, fallacy, or deception," 1610s, from dis- + abuse (v.). Related: Disabused; disabusing.

Related entries & more 
Carlos 
masc. proper name, Spanish form of the Germanic masculine proper name (Karl) that is represented in Italian by Carlo, in French by Charles.
Related entries & more 
post hoc 
Latin, "after this." Especially in post hoc, ergo propter hoc, logical fallacy, literally "after this, therefore because of this."
Related entries & more 
Montenegro 
Adriatic coastal nation, from Venetian Italian (Tuscan monte nero), literally "black mountain," a loan-translation of the local Slavonic name, Crnagora. Related: Montenegrine.
Related entries & more 
intentional (adj.)

"done with intention, design, or purpose; intended," 1520s, from intention + -al (1) or else from Medieval Latin intentionalis. Intentional fallacy recorded from 1946. Related: Intentionality.

Related entries & more