Etymology
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Monroe 

the surname (also Munroe, etc.) is said to be ultimately from the River Roe in Derry, Ireland. James Monroe (1758-1831), the fifth U.S. president, was in office from 1817 to 1825. The Monroe Doctrine (so called from 1848) is a reference to the principles of policy contained in his message to Congress on Dec. 2, 1823. Monrovia, the capital of Liberia, also was named for him at its founding in 1822 by the American Colonization Society.

In terms of national psychology, the Monroe Doctrine marked the moment when Americans no longer faced eastward across the Atlantic and turned to face westward across the continent. [Daniel Walker Howe, "What Hath God Wrought"]
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doctrine (n.)

late 14c., "the body of principles, dogmas, etc., in a religion or field of knowledge," from Old French doctrine (12c.) "teaching, doctrine" and directly from Latin doctrina "a teaching, body of teachings, learning," from doctor "teacher" (see doctor (n.)) + -ina, fem. of -inus, suffix forming fem. abstract nouns (see -ine (1)).

The notion is "whatever is taught or laid down as true by a master or instructor," hence "any set of principles held as true." In Middle English, it could be used generally for "learning, instruction, education." In U.S. history, the Monroe doctrine was put forward in a message to Congress Dec. 2, 1823; the exact phrase is attested by 1848.

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La-Z-Boy 
brand of recliner chair, 1929, Floral City Furniture Co., Monroe, Michigan, U.S. According to company lore, chosen from names submitted in a contest. See lazy + boy.
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doctrinal (adj.)

"pertaining to doctrine or doctrines, dealing with precepts of conduct," mid-15c., from Old French doctrinal and directly from Late Latin doctrinalis, from doctrina "teaching, body of teachings, learning" (see doctrine). 

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millenarianism 

"doctrine of or belief in the coming of the (Christian) millennium," 1800, from millenarian + -ism. A general doctrine in the early Church, it was in disfavor from 4c., but revived in Protestant denominations from 17c. From 1640s in the form millenarism.

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karmic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the doctrine of karma," 1883, from karma + -ic.

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anarchism (n.)
"political doctrine advocating leaderlessness," 1640s; see anarchy + -ism.
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hereditism (n.)
"scientific doctrine of hereditary transmission of characteristics," 1874; see heredity + -ism.
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protectionism (n.)

"doctrine or system of protection in political economy," 1846, from protectionist + -ism.

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agathism (n.)
the doctrine that all things tend toward the good, 1830, from agathist + -ism.
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