Etymology
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Monophysite 

1690s, from Church Latin Monophysita, from Greek monophysites, from monos "single, alone" (from PIE root *men- (4) "small, isolated") + physis "nature" (from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow"). A Christian (regarded in the West as a heretic) who believes there is only one nature, partly divine and partly human, in the person of Jesus Christ. Now comprising the Coptic, Armenian, Abyssinian and Jacobite churches. Related: Monophysitical; Monophysitism.

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*men- (4)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "small, isolated."

It forms all or part of: malmsey; manometer; monad; monarchy; monastery; monism; monist; monk; mono; mono-; monoceros; monochrome; monocle; monocular; monogamy; monogram; monolith; monologue; monomania; Monophysite; monopoly; monosyllable; monotony.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek monos "single, alone," manos "rare, sparse;" Armenian manr "thin, slender, small."

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*bheue- 

*bheuə-, also *bheu-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to be, exist, grow."

It forms all or part of: Bauhaus; be; beam; Boer; bondage; boodle; boom (n.1) "long pole;" boor; booth; bound (adj.2) "ready to go;" bower; bowery; build; bumpkin; busk; bustle (v.) "be active;" byre; bylaw; Eisteddfod; Euphues; fiat; forebear; future; husband; imp; Monophysite; neighbor; neophyte; phyletic; phylo-; phylum; phylogeny; physic; physico-; physics; physio-; physique; -phyte; phyto-; symphysis.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit bhavah "becoming," bhavati "becomes, happens," bhumih "earth, world;" Greek phyein "to bring forth, make grow," phytos, phyton "a plant," physis "growth, nature," phylon "tribe, class, race," phyle "tribe, clan;" Old English beon "be, exist, come to be, become, happen;" Old Church Slavonic byti "be," Greek phu- "become," Old Irish bi'u "I am," Lithuanian būti "to be," Russian byt' "to be."

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Copt (n.)

"native Monophysite Christian of Egypt," 1610s, from Modern Latin Coptus, from Arabic quft, which is of uncertain origin, probably from Coptic gyptios, from Greek Agyptios "Egyptian." Arabic has no -p- and often substitutes -f- or -b- for it. The majority of the Egyptian churches separated from the Orthodox Church after the Council of Chalcedon (451 C.E.). As an adjective, 1630s. Related: Coptic (1670s as an adjective; 1711 as the name of the language of the Copts).

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