Etymology
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monastery (n.)

"place of residence occupied in common by persons seeking religious seclusion from the world," c. 1400, monasterie, from Old French monastere "monastery" (14c.) and directly from Late Latin monasterium, from Ecclesiastical Greek monastērion "a monastery," from monazein "to live alone," from monos "alone" (from PIE root *men- (4) "small, isolated"). With suffix -terion "place for (doing something)." Originally applied to houses of any religious order, male or female, but commonly especially one used by monks. Related: Monasterial (mid-15c.).

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minster (n.)

Old English mynster "the church of a monastery" (8c.), from Late Latin monasterium (see monastery). Compare Old French moustier, French moûtier, Old Irish manister. Probably originally "a monastery," then "the church of a monastery." As many such churches in England came to be cathedrals, the word sometimes is used for "cathedral."

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monastic (adj.)

"pertaining to or characteristic of a religious recluse," mid-15c., monastik, from Old French monastique "monkish, monastic" and directly from Medieval Latin monasticus, from Ecclesiastical Greek monastikos "solitary, pertaining to a monk," from Greek monazein "to live alone" (see monastery). Related: Monastical (c. 1400).

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*men- (4)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "small, isolated."

It forms all or part of: malmsey; manometer; monad; monarchy; monastery; monism; monist; monk; mono; mono-; monoceros; monochrome; monocle; monocular; monogamy; monogram; monolith; monologue; monomania; Monophysite; monopoly; monosyllable; monotony.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek monos "single, alone," manos "rare, sparse;" Armenian manr "thin, slender, small."

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locutory (n.)
"room (in a monastery) for conversation," especially with those not connected with the monastery, late 15c., from Medieval Latin locutorium, from Late Latin locutor "a speaker," from Latin loqui "to talk" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak").
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Rabat 
Moroccan capital, from Arabic ar-ribat, from ribat "fortified monastery."
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bursary (n.)
"treasury of a college or monastery," 1690s, from Medieval Latin bursaria "treasurer's room," from bursarius, from bursa "bag, purse" (see purse (n.)).
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hostler (n.)
formerly also hosteler, late 14c., "one who tends to horses at an inn," also, occasionally, "innkeeper," from Anglo-French hostiler, Old French ostelier, hostelier "innkeeper; steward in a monastery" (12c., Modern French hôtelier), from Medieval Latin hostilarius "the monk who entertains guests at a monastery," from hospitale "inn" (see hospital). Compare ostler.
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friary (n.)

"convent of friars, monastery," 1530s, from French, from Old French frarie, from Medieval Latin fratria "a fraternity," from frater "brother" (from PIE root *bhrater- "brother").

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covent (n.)

"a convent or monastery" (early 13c.), also "a meeting, gathering, assembly" (c. 1300); an early variant of convent (n.) that lingered into the 17c.

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