Etymology
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mock (n.)

early 15c., mokke, "derisive action or speech;" late 15c. (Caxton) "that which one derides or mocks;" from mock (v.).

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mock (adj.)

prefixed to a noun, "feigned, counterfeit, spurious; having a close (but deceptive) resemblance," 1540s, from mock, verb and noun. Mock-heroic "counterfeiting or burlesquing the heroic style or character" is attested from 1711 (Addison), describing a satirical use of a serious form; mock-turtle "calf's head stewed or baked and dressed to resemble a turtle," is from 1758; as a kind of soup by 1783.

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sun (v.)
1510s, "to set something in the sun," from sun (n.). Intransitive meaning "expose oneself to the sun" is recorded from c. 1600. Sun-bathing is attested from c. 1600.
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sun (n.)

Old English sunne "the sun," from Proto-Germanic *sunno (source also of Old Norse, Old Saxon, Old High German sunna, Middle Dutch sonne, Dutch zon, German Sonne, Gothic sunno "the sun"), from PIE *s(u)wen-, alternative form of root *sawel- "the sun."

Old English sunne was feminine (as generally in Germanic), and the fem. pronoun was used in English until 16c.; since then masc. has prevailed. The empire on which the sun never sets (1630) originally was the Spanish, later the British. To have one's place in the sun (1680s) is from Pascal's "Pensées"; the German imperial foreign policy sense (1897) is from a speech by von Bülow.

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mock (v.)

mid-15c., mokken, "make fun of," also "to trick, delude, make a fool of; treat with scorn, treat derisively or contemptuously;" from Old French mocquer "deride, jeer," a word of unknown origin. Perhaps from Vulgar Latin *muccare "to blow the nose" (as a derisive gesture), from Latin mucus; or possibly from Middle Dutch mocken "to mumble" or Middle Low German mucken "grumble." Perhaps ultimately it is imitative of such speech. Related: Mocked; mocking. Replaced Old English bysmerian. The sense of "imitate, simulate, resemble closely" (1590s, as in mockingbird ; also see mock (adj.)) is from the notion of derisive imitation.

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sun-dance (n.)
Native American ceremony, 1849, from sun (n.) + dance (n.).
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sun-worship (n.)
1670s, from sun (n.) + worship (n.). Related: Sun-worshipper (1670s in the religious sense; 1941 as "devotee of sun-tanning").
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sun-wake (n.)
rays of the setting sun reflected on water, 1891, from sun (n.) + wake (n.). Sailors' tradition says a narrow wake means good weather the following day and bad weather follows a broad wake.
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sun-dress (n.)
also sundress, 1942, from sun (n.) + dress (n.).
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mock-up (n.)

also mockup, "model, simulation" 1919, perhaps World War I, from the verbal phrase mock up "make an experimental model" (1911), from mock (v.) + up (adv.).

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