Etymology
Advertisement
Mexico 

republic lying to the south of the U.S., from Spanish, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) mexihco, which originally referred to the Valley of Mexico around present-day Mexico City. It became the name of the nation (formerly New Spain) upon independence from Spain in 1821.

The etymology of this is opaque. Because of the difference in vowel length, it cannot be derived from ME-TL 'maguey.' The sequence XIH also differs in vowel length from XIC-TLI 'navel,' which has been proposed as a component element. The final element is locative -C(O). [Kartunnen]
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
New Mexico 

U.S. state based on the former Nuevo México province of New Spain (later Mexico); the name traces to 1560s and is a reference to the valley of Mexico, around modern Mexico City (see Mexico). Annexed to the U.S. as a territory in 1848; admitted as a state in 1912.

Related entries & more 
Tex-Mex (adj.)
by 1914, from Texas + Mexico. An earlier noun for "Texan of Mexican background" was Texican (1863).
Related entries & more 
Mexican 

c. 1600 (n.) "native or inhabitant of Mexico;" by 1640s (adj.) "native of or pertaining to Mexico or its inhabitants," from Mexico + -an. In the old U.S. Southwest it served as a general pejorative or dismissive adjective, much as Dutch did in the northeast: Mexican strawberries "beans;" Mexican standoff "battle that no one wins;" Mexican breakfast "a glass of water and a cigarette," etc.

Related entries & more 
pulque (n.)

fermented drink in Mexico and parts of Central America made from the juice of the agave, 1690s, from American Spanish pulque, a word of unknown origin, said to be a word from Araucanian (native language spoken in part of Chile), or else from some language of Mexico.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Zuni (n.)
native people and language of New Mexico, 1834, from Spanish, from a local native word.
Related entries & more 
Olmec 
ancient people and civilization of Mexico, 1787, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) Olmecatl (plural Olmeca), literally "inhabitant of the rubber country."
Related entries & more 
Toltec (adj.)
1787, in reference to an ancient people of Mexico, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) tolteca, literally "people of the tules" (cat-tail reeds).
Related entries & more 
peonage (n.)

the work or condition of a peon; a form of servitude formerly prevailing in Mexico," "1848, American English, from peon (q.v.) + -age.

Related entries & more 
mescal (n.)

"plant of the genus Agave," found in deserts of Mexico and southwestern U.S., especially the American aloe, or maguey plant, 1702, from Mexican Spanish, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) mexcalli "fermented drink made from agave," from metl "agave" + ixcalli "stew." Meaning "intoxicating liquor from fermented juice (pulque) of the agave" is attested in English from 1828. Also the name of a small desert cactus (peyote) found in northern Mexico and southern Texas (1885).

Related entries & more