Etymology
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disturbance (n.)

late 13c., "mental distress, emotional disorder of the mind, grief," from Old French destorbance (12c., Old North French distorbance), from destourber, from Latin disturbare "throw into disorder," from dis- "completely" (see dis-) + turbare "to disorder, disturb," from turba "turmoil" (see turbid).

Meaning "public disturbance, political agitation" is from c. 1300; that of "violent interruption of peace or unity" is late 14c.; it is the sense in disturbance of the (king's) peace," early 15c.

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mental (adj.)

early 15c., "in, of, or pertaining to the mind; characteristic of the intellect," from Late Latin mentalis "of the mind," from Latin mens (genitive mentis) "mind," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think."

In Middle English, also "of the soul, spiritual." From 1520s as "done or performed in the mind." Meaning "crazy, deranged" is by 1927, probably from combinations such as mental patient (1859); mental hospital (1891). Mental health is attested by 1803; mental illness by 1819; mental retardation by 1904.

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perturbation (n.)

late 14c., perturbacioun, "mental disturbance, state of being perturbed," from Old French perturbacion "disturbance, confusion" (14c.) and directly from Latin perturbationem (nominative perturbatio) "confusion, disorder, disturbance," noun of action from past participle stem of perturbare (see perturb).

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derangement (n.)

1737, "disturbance of regular order," from French dérangement (17c.), from déranger (see derange). Mental sense "disturbance of the intellect or reason" is from 1800.

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pother (n.)

1590s, "disturbance, commotion," a word of unknown origin. Meaning "mental trouble" is from 1640s; verb sense of "to fluster" is attested from 1690s. According to OED originally rhyming with other, brother; the pronunciation shift came in 19c. by influence of bother.

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distraction (n.)

mid-15c., distraccioun, "the drawing away of the mind from one point or course to another or others," from Latin distractionem (nominative distractio) "a pulling apart, separating," noun of action from past-participle stem of distrahere "draw in different directions" (see distract).

Sense of "a drawing of the mind in different directions, mental confusion or bewilderment" is from 1590s. Meaning "violent mental disturbance, excitement simulating madness" (in driven to distraction, etc.) is from c. 1600. Meaning "a thing or fact that causes mental diversion or bewilderment" is from 1610s.

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disorder (n.)

1520s, "lack of regular arrangement;" 1530s, "tumult, disturbance of the peace;" from disorder (v.). Meaning "an ailment, a disturbance of the body or mind" is by 1704.

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brawl (n.)
mid-15c., "noisy disturbance," from brawl (v.). Meaning "fist-fight" is by 1873.
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stir (n.)
"commotion, disturbance, tumult," late 14c. (in phrase on steir), probably from a Scandinavian source, such as Old Norse styrr "disturbance, tumult," from the same root as stir (v.)). The sense of "movement, bustle" (1560s) probably is from the English verb.
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ruction (n.)

"disturbance, disorderly dispute," 1825, a dialectal or colloquial word of unknown origin. Perhaps from eruption or an altered shortening of insurrection.

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