Etymology
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No results were found for melena. Showing results for melano.
Moldova 

country in Eastern Europe, named for the river through it, probably from a PIE word meaning "dark, darkish color, soiled, black" (see melano-).

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melanoma (n.)

"tumor containing melanin," 1826, medical Latin, from Greek melas (genitive melanos) "black" (see melano-) + -oma. Greek melanōma meant "blackness."

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melanosis (n.)

"abnormal deposition of pigmentary matter in organs or parts of the body," by 1815, medical Latin, from Greek melanosis "a becoming black," from melanoun "to become black," from melas (genitive melanos); see melano-. Related: Melanotic.

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melano- 

word-forming element meaning "black," from Greek melano-, combining form of melas (genitive melanos) "black, dark, murky,"probably from a PIE root *melh-"black, of darkish color" (source also of Sanskrit malinah "dirty, stained, black," Lithuanian mėlynas"blue," Latin mulleus "reddish"). 

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melanin (n.)

dark brown or black pigment found in animal bodies, 1832, Modern Latin, with chemical suffix -in (2); the first element is from Greek melas (genitive melanos) "black" (see melano-). Related: Melanism; melanistic.

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melanism (n.)

"an undue development of coloring material in the skin," especially in mammals or birds; the opposite of albinism (and the word probably based on it), by 1827; see melano- + -ism. Related: Melanistic.

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melatonin (n.)

chemical formed in the pineal gland of mammals that regulates certain physiological activities, 1958, from Greek melas "black, dark" (see melano-) + ending from serotonin. So called because its secretion is inhibited by sunlight, or because it changes the skin color of certain reptiles and amphibians.

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Melanie 

fem. proper name, literally "darkness, blackness," from Latin Melania, from Greek melania "blackness," from melas "black, dark" (see melano-). little used in U.S. before 1940, most popular in 1970s. Melanius was a Roman masc. proper name.

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mullet (n.1)

edible type of spiny-finned fish, late 14c., molet, from Anglo-French molett (late 14c.), Old French mulet "red mullet" and directly from Medieval Latin muletus, from Latin muletus, moletus, from mullus "red mullet," from Greek myllos, name of a Pontic fish, which perhaps is related to melos "black" (see melano-), but "As there is no further specification of the fish ... all explanations are up in the air" [Beekes]

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maulstick (n.)

"light stick used by painters to support the painting hand," 1650s, from Dutch maalstok, literally "painting stick," from mallen "to paint," from Proto-Germanic *mal- (source also of Old Norse mæla, Old High German malon "trace, draw, paint," German malen "to paint"), from mal "spot, mark, stain," perhaps from the same root as Greek melas "black" (see melano-), but the original sense is not color but marking. With stock "stick" (see stock (n.1)).

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