Etymology
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meaning (n.)

c. 1300, meninge, "sense, that which is intended to be expressed," also "act of remembering" (a sense now obsolete), verbal noun from mean (v.). Sense of "significance, import" is from 1680s.

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well-meaning (adj.)
late 14c., from well (adv.) + present participle of mean (v.).
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meaningly (adv.)

"in a meaning manner, significantly, with intention," mid-15c., from meaning + -ly (2).

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meaningful (adj.)

"full of meaning, significant," 1827, from meaning (n.) + -ful. Related: Meaningfully; meaningfulness.

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meaningless (adj.)

"destitute of sense or significance," 1730, from meaning + -less. Related: Meaninglessly; meaninglessness.

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split (n.)
1590s, "narrow cleft, crack, fissure," from split (v.). Meaning "piece of wood formed by splitting" is from 1610s. Meaning "an act of separation, a divorce" is from 1729. From 1861 as the name of the acrobatic feat. Meaning "a drink composed of two liquors" is from 1882; that of "sweet dish of sliced fruit with ice cream" is attested from 1920, American English. Slang meaning "share of the take" is from 1889. Meaning "a draw in a double-header" is from 1920.
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closeness (n.)
mid-15c., "confined condition," from close (adj.) + -ness. Meaning "stuffiness" (of air) is from 1590s; meaning "nearness" is from 1716.
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clip (n.2)

mid-15c., clips, "shears," from clip (v.1). Meaning "act of clipping" is from 1825, originally of sheep-shearing, later of haircuts. Meaning "rate of speed" is 1867 (compare clipper). Meaning "an extract from a movie" is from 1958.

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feeling (n.)
late 12c., "act of touching, sense of touch," verbal noun from feel (v.). Meaning "a conscious emotion" is mid-14c. Meaning "what one feels (about something), opinion" is from mid-15c. Meaning "capacity to feel" is from 1580s.
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squirt (n.)
late 14c., "diarrhea," from squirt (v.). Meaning "jet of liquid" is from 1620s. Meaning "a whipper-snapper" is from 1839.
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