Etymology
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max (v.)

"to reach the maximum level," by 1986, colloquial, from maximize or related words. Related: Maxed; maxing. As a noun, by 1811 in reference to a kind of gin said to be the best, apparently an abbreviation of French maxime.

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born (adj.)

Old English boren, alternative past participle of beran (see bear (v.)). The -en of the Middle English past participles tended to drop the -e- in some verbs, especially after vowels, -r-, and -l- , hence also slain, etc., Middle English stoln. "In modern use the connexion with bear is no longer felt; the phrase to be born has become virtually an intr. verb" [OED].

It is attested from early 14c. as "possessing from birth the character or quality described" (born poet, born loser, etc.). It is from 1710 as "innate, inherited;" the colloquial expression in (one's) born days "in (one's) lifetime" is by 1742.  The distinction of born from borne (q.v.) is 17c. 

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born-again (adj.)

of Protestant Christians, "regenerated in spirit and character by a 'new birth' in Christ," by 1920, based on John iii.3. Used in figurative (non-religious) sense by 1977.

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high-born (adj.)

also highborn, "of noble birth," c. 1300, from high (adv.) + born.

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natural-born (adj.)

"so by nature, born so," 1580s, from natural (adj.) + born.

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first-born (adj., n.)

"first in order of birth," as a noun, "first-born child," mid-14c., from first (adj.) + born.

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free-born (adj.)

"inheriting liberty," mid-14c., from free (adj.) + born. Old English had freolic (adj.) "free, free-born; glorious, magnificent, noble; beautiful, charming," which became Middle English freli, "a stock epithet of compliment," but which died out, perhaps as the form merged with that of freely (adv.).

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well-born (adj.)

Old English welboren; see well (adv.) + born.

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Betamax (n.)

1975, proprietary name (Sony), from Japanese beta-beta "all over" + max, from English maximum.

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Braun 

German manufacturing company, named for founder Max Braun, mechanical engineer in Frankfurt am Main (1921).

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