Etymology
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maturity (n.)

early 15c., "maturity of character;" mid-15c., "ripeness, completeness, full development," from Old French maturité and directly from Latin mātūritatem (nominative mātūritas) "ripeness," from mātūrus "ripe" (see mature (v.)). Financial sense "time fixed for payment of an obligation" is by 1815.

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adolescent (adj.)
1785, "growing toward maturity," from Latin adolescentem/adulescentem (nominative adolescens/adulescens) "growing, near maturity, youthful," present participle of adolescere "grow up, come to maturity, ripen" (see adolescent (n.)).
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ripen (v.)

1560s, of fruits, seeds, etc., "grow ripe, come to maturity," from ripe (adj.) + -en (1). Figurative use by c. 1600. The transitive sense of "bring to maturity, make ripe" also is from 1560s. Related: Ripened; ripening. The earlier verb was simply ripe, Middle English ripen, from late Old English ripian, from the adjective.

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maturely (adv.)

1530s, "promptly," from mature (adj.) + -ly (2). Sense of "with full deliberation" is from 1590s; that of "in a way indicative of maturity" is from 1841.

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maturate (v.)

1540s, (transitive) "to bring to maturity," back-formation from maturation. Intransitive sense of "to ripen" is by 1620s. Related: Maturated; maturating.

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grow up (v.)
"advance toward maturity," 1530s, from grow (v.) + up (adv.). As a command to be sensible, from 1951.
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puberty (n.)

"condition of being able to reproduce, sexual maturity," or, as Johnson has it, "the time of life in which the two sexes begin first to be acquainted;" late 14c., pubertē, from Old French puberté and directly from Latin pubertatem (nominative pubertas) "age of maturity, manhood," from pubes (genitive pubertis) "adult, full-grown, manly," also, as a noun, "the signs of manhood, the private parts; grown-up males," a word of uncertain origin. Related: Puberal; pubertal.

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immaturity (n.)
1530s, "untimeliness," from Latin immaturitatem (nominative immaturitas) "unripeness," from immaturus "unripe, untimely" (see immature). Meaning "lack of maturity" attested from c. 1600.
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mellow (v.)

1570s, "to ripen, bring to maturity" (transitive), from mellow (adj.). Intransitive sense of "become soft, be ripened" is from 1590s. Transferred sense of "give richness, flavor, or delicacy to" is from 1590s. Related: Mellowed; mellowing.

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mature (v.)

c. 1400, maturen, "encourage suppuration;" mid-15c., of plants, "cause to ripen, bring to maturity," from Latin mātūrare "to ripen, bring to maturity," from mātūrus "ripe, timely, early," related to māne "early, of the morning," from PIE *meh-tu- "ripeness." De Vaan writes that "The root is probably the same as in mānus 'good'." Intransitive sense of "come to a state of ripeness, become ripe or perfect" is from 1650s. The financial sense of "reach the time for payment" is by 1861. Related: Matured; maturing.

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