Etymology
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Matthew 
masc. proper name, introduced in England by the Normans, from Old French Mathieu, from Late Latin Matthaeus, from Greek Matthaios, contraction of Mattathias, from Hebrew Mattathyah "gift of Jehovah," from mattath "gift." Variant Matthias is from the Greek version.
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Matthias 
masc. proper name, from Late Latin Matthias, from Greek Matthaios (see Matthew).
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Gadarene swine (n.)
an image from Matthew viii.28. From Gadara, town of ancient times near Galilee.
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Gethsemane 
name of a garden on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem (Matthew xxvi.36-46), from Greek Gethsemane, from Aramaic (Semitic) gath shemani(m) "oil-press."
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unforgivable (adj.)
1540s, from un- (1) "not" + forgivable. In early use, especially with reference to the sin described in Matthew xii.31. Related: Unforgivably.
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Hellenism (n.)
c. 1600, "idiom or expression peculiar to Greek;" see Hellenic + -ism. In sense "culture and ideals of ancient Greece," 1865 (by Matthew Arnold, contrasted with Hebraism).
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jot (n.)
"the least part of anything," 1520s, from Latin iota, from Greek iota "the letter -i-," the smallest letter in the Greek alphabet, also "the least part of anything" (see iota). Usually (and originally) with tittle, from Matthew v.18.
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straight (adj.2)
"conventional," especially "heterosexual," 1941, a secondary sense evolved from straight (adj.1), probably suggested by straight and narrow path "course of conventional morality and law-abiding behavior," which is based on a misreading of Matthew vii.14 (where the gate is actually strait), and the other influence seems to be from strait-laced.
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mote (n.)

"small particle, as of dust visible in a ray of sunlight," Old English mot, of unknown origin; perhaps related to Dutch mot "dust from turf, sawdust, grit," Norwegian mutt "speck, mote, splinter, chip." Hence, anything very small. Many references are to Matthew vii.3.

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Childermas (n.)

"festival of the Holy Innocents" (Dec. 28), late Old English *cildramæsse (c. 1000), from obsolete plural of child (q.v.) + mass (n.2). It commemorates the slaughter of children in and around Bethlehem by order of Herod (Matthew ii.16-18).

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