Etymology
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resource (n.)

1610s, "any means of supplying a want or deficiency," from French resourse "a source, a spring," noun use of fem. past participle of Old French resourdre "to rally, raise again," from Latin resurgere "rise again" (see resurgent).

The meaning "possibility of aid or assistance" (often with a negative) is by 1690s; the meaning "expedient, device, shift" also is from 1690s. Resources as "a country's wealth, means of raising money and supplies" is recorded by 1779. A library resource center was so called by 1968.

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resource (v.)

"supply with resources," 1975, from resource (n.). Related: Resourced; resourcing.

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material (adj.)

mid-14c., "real, ordinary; earthly, drawn from the material world" (contrasted with spiritual, mental, supernatural), a term in scholastic philosophy and theology, from Old French material, materiel (14c.) and directly from Late Latin materialis (adj.) "of or belonging to matter," from Latin materia "matter, stuff, wood, timber" (see matter (n.)).

From late 14c. as "made of matter, having material existence; material, physical, substantial." From late 15c. as "important, relevant, necessary, pertaining to the matter or subject;" in the law of evidence, "of legal significance to the cause" (1580s).

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material (n.)

late 14c., "component substance, matter from which a thing is made," from material (adj.).

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URL 

by 1990, initialism (acronym) from uniform resource locator.

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resourceful (adj.)

1807, "shifty, fertile in expedient," from resource (n.) + -ful. By 1847 as "rich or abounding in resources." Related: Resourcefully; resourcefulness. Resourceless is from 1787.

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pis aller (n.)

"last resource, what one would do at the worst," 1670s, French, literally "to go worse," from pis "worse," from Latin peius, neuter of peior "worse" (see pejorative) + aller "to go" (see alley (n.1)).

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rehash (n.)

"old material worked up anew, something concocted from material formerly used," usually of literary productions, 1849, from rehash (v.).

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materialize (v.)

also materialise, 1710, "represent as material," from material (adj.) + -ize. Meaning "reduce to a material basis or standard" is by 1820. Intransitive meaning "appear in bodily form, make physically perceptible" is by 1866, originally in spiritualism. Related: Materialized; materializing.

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resort (v.)

c. 1400, resorten, "advance, proceed; come or go; return (to a subject or topic); go to (someone) for aid, turn to for protection, mercy, etc.," from Old French resortir "recourse, appeal" (Modern French ressortir), from resort "resource, a help, an aid" (see resort (n.)). Related: Resorted; resorting.

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