Etymology
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logic (n.)

mid-14c., logike, "branch of philosophy that treats of forms of thinking; the science of distinction of true from false reasoning," from Old French logique (13c.), from Latin (ars) logica "logic," from Greek (he) logike (techne) "(the) reasoning (art)," from fem. of logikos "pertaining to speaking or reasoning" (also "of or pertaining to speech"), from logos "reason, idea, word" (see Logos). Formerly also logick. Sometimes formerly plural, as in ethics, but this is not usual. Meaning "logical argumentation" is from c. 1600. Contemptuous logic-chopper "sophist, person who uses subtle distinctions in argument" is from 1846.

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material (adj.)

mid-14c., "real, ordinary; earthly, drawn from the material world" (contrasted with spiritual, mental, supernatural), a term in scholastic philosophy and theology, from Old French material, materiel (14c.) and directly from Late Latin materialis (adj.) "of or belonging to matter," from Latin materia "matter, stuff, wood, timber" (see matter (n.)).

From late 14c. as "made of matter, having material existence; material, physical, substantial." From late 15c. as "important, relevant, necessary, pertaining to the matter or subject;" in the law of evidence, "of legal significance to the cause" (1580s).

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material (n.)

late 14c., "component substance, matter from which a thing is made," from material (adj.).

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synthetic (adj.)
1690s, as a term in logic, "deductive," from French synthétique (17c.) and directly from Modern Latin syntheticus, from Greek synthetikos "skilled in putting together, constructive," from synthetos "put together, constructed, compounded," past participle of syntithenai "to put together" (see synthesis). From 1874 in reference to products or materials made artificially by chemical synthesis; hence "artificial" (1930). As a noun, "synthetic material," from 1934. Related: Synthetical (1620s in logic).
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physicological (adj.)

"pertaining to logic as illustrated by physics," 1704, from physicologic "logic illustrated by physics," from physico- + logic. Related: Physicologic; physicologically.

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logician (n.)
"person skilled in logic," late 14c., from Old French logicien (13c.), from logique (see logic). The Greek word was logistes.
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metalogical (n.)

"beyond the sphere of logic, transcending logic," by 1865; see meta- in the third sense of "transcending, overarching, dealing with the most fundamental matters of" + logical. Related: Metalogic (n.), by 1842; metalogical.

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logical (adj.)
early 15c., "based on reason, according to the principles of logic," from logic + -al (1). Meaning "pertaining to logic" is c. 1500. Attested from 1860 as "following as a reasonable consequence." Related: Logically. Logical positivism, in reference to the ideas of the Vienna Circle of philosophers, is from 1931.
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thematic (adj.)
1690s, in logic, from Greek thematikos, from thema (genitive thematos; see theme). From 1871 of writing or discourse. Related: Thematical; thematically.
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analytics (n.)
the division of logic which distinguishes good from bad arguments, 1590s, from Latin analytica from Greek analytika, from stem of analyein "unloose, release, set free," from ana "up, back, throughout" (see ana-) + lysis "a loosening," from lyein "to unfasten" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart"); also see -ics. Ta Analytika was the name of Aristotle's treatises on logic.
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