Etymology
Advertisement
jar (v.)
1520s, "to make a brief, harsh, grating sound," often in reference to bird screeches; the word often is said to be echoic or imitative; compare jargon (n.), jay (n.), garrulous. Figurative sense of "have an unpleasant effect on" is from 1530s; that of "cause to vibrate or shake" is from 1560s. Related: Jarred; jarring. As a noun in this sense from 1540s.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
jar (n.)

"simple earthen or glass cylindrical vessel," early 15c., possibly from rare Old French jarre "liquid measure smaller than a barrel," or more likely from Medieval Latin jarra (13c.) or Spanish or Catalan jarra (13c.), all ultimately from Arabic jarrah "earthen water vessel, ewer" (whence also Provençal jarra, Italian giarra), a general word in the 13c. Mediterranean sea-trade, which is from Persian jarrah "a jar, earthen water-vessel." Originally in English a large container used for importing olive oil.

In Britain in the 15th to 17th centuries, oil-lamps were overall not often used, because the oil was too expensive. Usage increased in the 17th century despite the expense. Olive oil was the most-often-used type of oil in the oil-lamps until the 18th century. The indications are good that no country or region exported more oil to Britain than southern Spain did in the 15th-17th centuries, with southern Italy coming second. ["English Words of Arabic Ancestry"]
Related entries & more 
mason (n.)

c. 1200 (early 12c. as a surname), masoun, "stoneworker, builder in stone, one who dresses, lays, or carves stone," from Old French masson, maçon "stone mason" (Old North French machun), probaby from Frankish *makjo or some other Germanic source (compare Old High German steinmezzo "stone mason," Modern German Steinmetz, with second element related to mahhon "to make"); from PIE root *mag- "to knead, fashion, fit."

But it also might be from, or influenced by, Medieval Latin machio, matio (7c.) which is said by Isidore to be derived from machina (see machine (n.)). The medieval word also might be from the root of Latin maceria "wall." Meaning "a member of the fraternity of freemasons" is attested from early 15c. in Anglo-French. The Mason jar (by 1868), a type of molded glass jar with an airtight screw lid, used for home preserves, is named for John L. Mason of New York, who patented it in 1858. 

Related entries & more 
Anti-Mason (n.)
by 1928 in reference to a U.S. third political party formed in opposition to elites and for a time powerful in the mid-Atlantic states, from anti- + Mason, in reference to the secret society. Related: Anti-Masonic.
Related entries & more 
bell-jar (n.)
1830, so called for its shape, from bell (n.) + jar (n.). Earlier was bell-glass (1680s).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Mason-Dixon Line 

by 1779, named for Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, English astronomers who surveyed (1763-7) the disputed boundary between the colonial holdings of the Penns (Pennsylvania) and the Calverts (Maryland). It became the technical boundary between "free" and "slave" states after 1804, when the last slaveholding state above it (New Jersey) passed its abolition act. As the line between "the North" and "the South" in U.S. culture, it is attested by 1834.

Related entries & more 
masonry (n.)

mid-14c., masonrie, "stonework, a construction of dressed or fitted stones;" late 14c., "art or occupation of a mason;" from Old French maçonerie (14c.), from maçon (see mason).

Related entries & more 
Masonite 

1926, proprietary name of a type of fiberboard, by Mason Fibre Company, Laurel, Mississippi, U.S., and named for  William H. Mason (1877-1940), protege of Edison, who patented the process of making it. Earlier (1840) as a word in mineralogy for a type of chloritoid; the name honors Owen Mason of Providence, R.I., a collector who first brought the mineral to the attention of geologists.

Related entries & more 
jarhead (n.)
also jar-head, "U.S. Marine," by 1985 (but in a biographical book with a World War II setting), from jar + head (n.). Also used as a general term of insult (by 1979) and by 1922 as a Georgia dialectal word for "mule."
Related entries & more 
masonic (adj.)

1767, "of or pertaining to the fraternity of freemasons;" 1810, "of or pertaining to stone masons;" see mason + -ic.

Related entries & more