Etymology
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Marxist (n.)

1886, "a devotee of the teachings of German political theorist Karl Marx" (1818-1883), from French marxiste. The adjective, "of or pertaining to the socialist doctrines and theories of Karl Marx," is attested from 1884. The alternative adjectival form Marxian (1887 in reference to Karl Marx) sometimes is used (1940, by Groucho, among others) to distinguish the U.S. vaudeville family from the German political theorist.

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Marxism (n.)

"the political and economic theories of Karl Marx," 1885, probably immediately from French marxisme; see Marxist + -ism. From 1884 as Karl Marxism. Marxism-Leninism is attested by 1932.

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Maoist 

1951 (adj.), 1963 (n.), in reference to the Marxist-Leninist communist doctrines developed by Chairman Mao Tse-tung (1893-1976), Chinese communist leader. Related: Maoism.

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Che 

nickname of Argentine Marxist revolutionary Ernesto Guevara (1928-1967), given to him by Cuban exiles in Guatemala in mid-1950s, from his dialectal use of Argentine che, a slang filler word in speech.

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praxis (n.)

1580s, "practice or discipline for a specific purpose," from Medieval Latin praxis "practice, exercise, action" (mid-13c., opposite of theory), from Greek praxis "practice, action, doing," from stem of prassein, prattein "to do, to act" (see practical). From 1610s as "a collection of examples for practice." In 20c. given a particular sense in Marxist jargon.

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reification (n.)

1846, "mental act of materializing (a person or concept), objectivization, the regarding or treating of an idea as a thing," from Latin re-, stem of res "thing" (see re), + -fication "a making or causing." In Marxist writing, "depersonalization," translating German Verdinglichung.

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commodification (n.)

"action of converting (something) into a commercial product or activity," 1968, from commodity + -fication "a making or causing." Originally in Marxist political theory, "the assignment of a market value," often to some quality or thing that the user of the word feels would be better off without it.

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reactionary (adj.)

1831, "of or pertaining to political reaction, tending to revert from a more to a less advanced policy," on model of French réactionnaire (19c.), from réaction (see reaction). In Marxist use by 1858 as "tending toward reversing existing tendencies," opposed to revolutionary and used opprobriously in reference to opponents of communism. Non-political use, "of or pertaining to a (chemical, etc.) reaction" (1847) is rare. As a noun, "person considered reactionary," especially in politics, one who seeks to check or undo political action, by 1855.

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