Etymology
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Mao (adj.)

1967 in reference to a simple style of clothing popularized in the West and based on dress in Communist China, from French, from name of Mao Tse-tung (1893-1976), Chinese communist leader.

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Pinyin (n.)

system of Romanized spelling for Chinese, 1963, from Chinese pinyin "to spell, to combine sounds into syllables," from pin "put together" + yin "sound, tone." Adopted officially by the People's Republic of China in 1958. Outside China gradually superseding the 19c. Wade-Giles system (Mao Tse-tung is Wade-Giles, Mao Zedong is Pinyin).

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Gang of Four 
1976, translating Chinese sirenbang, the nickname given to the four leaders of the Cultural Revolution who took the fall in Communist China after the death of Mao.
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Maoist 

1951 (adj.), 1963 (n.), in reference to the Marxist-Leninist communist doctrines developed by Chairman Mao Tse-tung (1893-1976), Chinese communist leader. Related: Maoism.

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paper (adj.)

1590s, "made of paper, consisting of paper," from paper (n.). Figurative of something flimsy or unsubstantial from 1716, probably on the notion of "appearing merely in written or printed statements, not tangible or existing in reality." Paper tiger (1952) translates Chinese tsuh lao fu, popularized by Mao Zedong. Paper doll is attested by 1817; paper plate "disposable plate made of paper or cardboard" is from 1723. Paper money is from 1690s.

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